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Adaptive policies for reducing inequalities in the social determinants of health.

Carey, Gemma; Crammond, Bradley R; Malbon, Eleanor; Carey, Nicole

Description

Inequalities in the social determinants of health (SDH), which drive avoidable health disparities between different individuals or groups, is a major concern for a number of international organisations, including the World Health Organization (WHO). Despite this, the pathways to changing inequalities in the SDH remain elusive. The methodologies and concepts within system science are now viewed as important domains of knowledge, ideas and skills for tackling issues of inequality, which are...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCarey, Gemma
dc.contributor.authorCrammond, Bradley R
dc.contributor.authorMalbon, Eleanor
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:26:02Z
dc.identifier.issn2322-5939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/21584
dc.description.abstractInequalities in the social determinants of health (SDH), which drive avoidable health disparities between different individuals or groups, is a major concern for a number of international organisations, including the World Health Organization (WHO). Despite this, the pathways to changing inequalities in the SDH remain elusive. The methodologies and concepts within system science are now viewed as important domains of knowledge, ideas and skills for tackling issues of inequality, which are increasingly understood as emergent properties of complex systems. In this paper, we introduce and expand the concept of adaptive policies to reduce inequalities in the distribution of the SDH. The concept of adaptive policy for health equity was developed through reviewing the literature on learning and adaptive policies. Using a series of illustrative examples from education and poverty alleviation, which have their basis in real world policies, we demonstrate how an adaptive policy approach is more suited to the management of the emergent properties of inequalities in the SDH than traditional policy approaches. This is because they are better placed to handle future uncertainties. Our intention is that these examples are illustrative, rather than prescriptive, and serve to create a conversation regarding appropriate adaptive policies for progressing policy action on the SDH.
dc.publisherKerman University of Medical Science
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Health Policy and Management
dc.titleAdaptive policies for reducing inequalities in the social determinants of health.
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume4
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absfor160509 - Public Administration
local.identifier.ariespublicationU5654936xPUB17
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCarey, Gemma, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCrammond, Bradley R, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationMalbon, Eleanor, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCarey, Nicole, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.doi10.15171/ijhpm.2015.170
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:38:24Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85002033513
local.identifier.thomsonID000379813000008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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