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"Moved on"? An exploratory study of the Cashless Debit Card and Indigenous mobility

Vincent, Eve; Markham, Francis; Klein, Elise

Description

What is the relationship between the first two trials of the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) and Indigenous mobility? In Ceduna, Vincent conducted ethnographic research into lived experiences of the first CDC trial. In the East Kimberley, Klein conducted 51 structured interviews with people on the card and 37 semi‐structured interviews with key informants. Markham used regression analysis of net migration rates at the Statistical Area 2 level to determine whether the CDC trial sites were associated...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorVincent, Eve
dc.contributor.authorMarkham, Francis
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Elise
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-06T01:44:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0157-6321
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/212326
dc.description.abstractWhat is the relationship between the first two trials of the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) and Indigenous mobility? In Ceduna, Vincent conducted ethnographic research into lived experiences of the first CDC trial. In the East Kimberley, Klein conducted 51 structured interviews with people on the card and 37 semi‐structured interviews with key informants. Markham used regression analysis of net migration rates at the Statistical Area 2 level to determine whether the CDC trial sites were associated with greater net population loss in 2016 census data than comparable locations. Our exploratory study finds significant local talk of displacement arising from the introduction of the CDC, as well as discussion of short‐term trips away from the trial sites being made more difficult. The regression analysis found that the net migration rate was 9.3 per cent points (95% CI: 2.0, 16.5) lower in Ceduna, Wyndham and Kununurra when compared with a group of comparable towns, and 5.2 per cent points (95% CI: 0.9, 9.5) lower when compared with Australia as a whole, meaning that the populations of these towns declined faster than those of comparable towns. Policy effects on mobility should be taken seriously by researchers and policymakers when considering place‐based welfare policy.
dc.description.sponsorshipIn the past 36 months, Markham has received research funding from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (Commonwealth), the Department of Communications and the Arts (Commonwealth), The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and Aboriginal Affairs NSW
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Council of Social Services
dc.rights© 2019 Australian Social Policy Association
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Social Issues
dc.title"Moved on"? An exploratory study of the Cashless Debit Card and Indigenous mobility
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor160501 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5786633xPUB1389
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationVincent, Eve, Macquarie University
local.contributor.affiliationMarkham, Francis, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKlein, Elise, University of Melbourne
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage27
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage39
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ajs4.84
dc.date.updated2020-06-28T08:19:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85075763143
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000498770100001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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