Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Malaria control in Papua New Guinea results in complex epidemiological changes

Mueller, Ivo; Tulloch, Jim; Marfurt, Jutta; Hide, Robin; Reeder, John C

Description

With a renewed interest in large-scale malaria interventions, knowledge about the possible long-term effects of such interventions on the nature of malaria transmission is essential. We document complex changes in malaria epidemiology over the last 40 years associated with changing malaria control activities in Karimui, an isolated area in Papua New Guinea. An initially equal distribution of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae changed to currently 68% P. falciparum, after passing...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMueller, Ivo
dc.contributor.authorTulloch, Jim
dc.contributor.authorMarfurt, Jutta
dc.contributor.authorHide, Robin
dc.contributor.authorReeder, John C
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:25:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0031-1480
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/21177
dc.description.abstractWith a renewed interest in large-scale malaria interventions, knowledge about the possible long-term effects of such interventions on the nature of malaria transmission is essential. We document complex changes in malaria epidemiology over the last 40 years associated with changing malaria control activities in Karimui, an isolated area in Papua New Guinea. An initially equal distribution of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae changed to currently 68% P. falciparum, after passing through a phase of transitory P. vivax dominance, when control started to fail. Initial drops in malaria prevalence proved difficult to sustain and present post-control levels are significantly higher than pre-control levels. The example of Karimui indicates that unsustained control can lead to changes in malaria patterns that may leave a population worse off.
dc.publisherMedical Society of Papua New Guinea
dc.sourcePapua New Guinea Medical Journal
dc.subjectKeywords: animal; article; disease transmission; human; infection control; malaria; methodology; Papua New Guinea; pathology; Plasmodium falciparum; Plasmodium malariae; Plasmodium vivax; prevalence; spleen; statistics; Animals; Communicable Disease Control; Humans
dc.titleMalaria control in Papua New Guinea results in complex epidemiological changes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume48
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor050299 - Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9305715xPUB15
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMueller, Ivo, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
local.contributor.affiliationTulloch, Jim, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
local.contributor.affiliationMarfurt, Jutta, University of Zurich
local.contributor.affiliationHide, Robin, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationReeder, John C, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3-4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage151
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage157
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T09:33:52Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33847296247
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Mueller_Malaria_control_in_Papua_New_2006.pdf564.58 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator