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The role of rhythmical pattern body movement in ANZAC commemoration and site connotations

Parker, Stephanie

Description

This studio practice investigated the role that rhythmical pattern body movement has in communicating connotation in a commemorative environment to an attending audience. The project's inspiration was the Australian War Memorial's daily Last Post Ceremony, which transmits the Cult of Anzac. There is an interactive relationship in an environment between architectural structures and people. Stephens argued that architectural structures act as focus points that transform and communicate knowledge...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorParker, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-29T03:16:25Z
dc.date.available2020-09-29T03:16:25Z
dc.identifier.otherb71499593
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/211666
dc.description.abstractThis studio practice investigated the role that rhythmical pattern body movement has in communicating connotation in a commemorative environment to an attending audience. The project's inspiration was the Australian War Memorial's daily Last Post Ceremony, which transmits the Cult of Anzac. There is an interactive relationship in an environment between architectural structures and people. Stephens argued that architectural structures act as focus points that transform and communicate knowledge by bodily affecting moods, feelings and emotions. Kelly theorised that performances allow for the 'correct' knowledge or belief to be transmitted orally, which can be mnemonically associated with specific locations in the environment to give purpose. However, the role of the performance element of rhythmical pattern body movement is unknown. For this exploration, the principle instrument was me using my Hilal Dance practice, which was recorded through performance autoethnography and video. However, Thrift's non-representational theory (i.e., written text inadequately communicates multi-sensual practices and experiences) applies here. Through my Anzac Parade Series, Wreath-Laying Series and art exhibition, rhythmical pattern body movement communicated a commemorative meaning that modified sites' significance. Combined with the ceremonial object, the red poppy wreath, this significance is translated through movement quality and rhythm to provide solemnity and gravitas to the remembrance of sacrifice and hope for the future. At the Reconciliation Place, the red poppy wreath lying on the mound located physically on the AWM-Parliamentary land axis meant the mound was the central point for remembrance to all those who died for their country. Through the repetitive red poppy wreath-laying performance and the LPC, the exhibition explored the idea of how not only a particular commemorative connotation is given to a space but also this performance's frequency has religious associations. The project demonstrated how rhythmical pattern body movement communicates connotations in a performance.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.titleThe role of rhythmical pattern body movement in ANZAC commemoration and site connotations
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorSambrani, Chaitanya
local.contributor.supervisorcontactu9811314@anu.edu.au
dc.date.issued2021
local.contributor.affiliationCollege of Arts and Social Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/X0KN-9C03
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.thesisANUonly.author7a5f79e6-ce27-43b8-a166-0ed1665da285
local.thesisANUonly.title000000011859_TS_2
local.thesisANUonly.key1d8ec370-6f9c-5dfd-8cdf-f036b3fc339e
local.mintdoimint
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