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"They can rest at home": An observational study of patients' quality of sleep in an Australian hospital

Delaney, Lori; Currie, Marian; Huang, Hsin-Chia; Lopez, Violeta; Van Haren, Frank

Description

Background: Poor sleep is known to adversely affect hospital patients' recovery and rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to investigate the perceived duration and quality of patient sleep and identify any environmental factors associated with patient-reported poor sleep in hospital. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 15 clinical units within a 672-bed tertiary-referral hospital in Australia. Semi-structured interviews to determine perceptions of sleep quantity and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDelaney, Lori
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Marian
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Hsin-Chia
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Violeta
dc.contributor.authorVan Haren, Frank
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T01:57:43Z
dc.date.available2020-09-21T01:57:43Z
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/210666
dc.description.abstractBackground: Poor sleep is known to adversely affect hospital patients' recovery and rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to investigate the perceived duration and quality of patient sleep and identify any environmental factors associated with patient-reported poor sleep in hospital. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 15 clinical units within a 672-bed tertiary-referral hospital in Australia. Semi-structured interviews to determine perceptions of sleep quantity and quality and factors that disturb nocturnal sleep were conducted with patients and nursing staff. Environmental noise, light and temperature were monitored overnight, with concurrent logging of noise sources by observers. Results: Patients reported a mean reduction in hospital sleep duration, compared to home, of 1.8 h (5.3 vs. 7.1 h; p < 0.001). The proportions of patients reporting their sleep quality to be poor/very poor, fair and of good quality were 41.6, 34.2 and 24.2% respectively. Patients reported poorer sleep quality than nurses (p < 0.05). Patients, nurses and observers all reported the main factors associated with poor sleep as clinical care interventions (34.3%) and environmental noise (32.1%). Noise levels in all 15 clinical areas exceeded WHO recommended levels of < 30 dB [A] by 36.7 to 82.6%, with peak noise levels of 51.3 to 103.3 dB (A). Conclusion: Hospital in-patients are exposed to factors which reduce the duration and quality of their sleep. These extrinsic factors are potentially modifiable through behaviour change and reconfiguration of the clinical environment. The findings from this study provided the foundation for a quality improvement project currently underway to improve patients' sleep.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was provided funding support from the Hospital Foundation and Office of the Chief Nurse.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© The Author(s).
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceBMC Health Services Research
dc.title"They can rest at home": An observational study of patients' quality of sleep in an Australian hospital
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor110310 - Intensive Care
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5369653xPUB199
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDelaney, Lori, Non-ANU institution, The Canberra Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationCurrie, Marian, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHuang, Hsin-Chia, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLopez, Violeta, National University of Singapore
local.contributor.affiliationVan Haren, Frank, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue524
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage9
local.identifier.doi10.1186/s12913-018-3201-z
local.identifier.absseo920199 - Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2020-06-23T00:56:17Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85049594573
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenance© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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