Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Is the association between poor job control and common mental disorder explained by general perceptions of control? Findings from an Australian longitudinal cohort

Too, Lay San; Leach, Liana; Butterworth, Peter

Description

Objectives This study sought to examine the influence of general perceptions of control on the association between job control and mental health. Methods We used four waves of data from a cohort of mid-aged adults from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Study (baseline N=2106). Key measures included job control and likelihood of experiencing a common mental disorder (anxiety and/or depression). The data were analyzed using longitudinal random-intercept regression models,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorToo, Lay San
dc.contributor.authorLeach, Liana
dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T23:58:56Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T23:58:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0355-3140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/210487
dc.description.abstractObjectives This study sought to examine the influence of general perceptions of control on the association between job control and mental health. Methods We used four waves of data from a cohort of mid-aged adults from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Study (baseline N=2106). Key measures included job control and likelihood of experiencing a common mental disorder (anxiety and/or depression). The data were analyzed using longitudinal random-intercept regression models, controlling for a range of potential confounders including general perceptions of control (ie, not isolated to the work context) via a measure of mastery. The analyses isolated the effect of within-person changes in job control on mental health (apart from between-person differences). Results The results show that the effect of job control remained significant after adjusting for general perceptions of control and other confounders. The within-person effect in the model demonstrated that, when workers had low job control, they were twice as likely to experience a common mental disorder [odds ratio (OR) 2.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53‒2.73]. Conclusions Individuals' general perceptions of control in life does not account for the association between low job control and poor mental health. The findings add a new layer of evidence to the literature demonstrating that lack of autonomy at work is an independent predictor of employees' mental health. Increasing employee control should be integrated into workplace strategies to promote mental health.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe PATH Through Life Study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (973302, 179805, 418139), and the Australian Government Agency — Safe Work Australia. It is currently managed by both the ANU and the University of New South Wales. PB was supported by ARC Future Fellowship (FT130101444) and a University of Melbourne Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Research Fellowship
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherFinnish Institute of Occupational Health
dc.rights© Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
dc.titleIs the association between poor job control and common mental disorder explained by general perceptions of control? Findings from an Australian longitudinal cohort
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume46
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationU1070655xPUB160
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.sjweh.fi/index.php
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationToo, Lay San, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationLeach, Liana, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT130101444
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/973302
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/179805
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/418139
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage311
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage320
local.identifier.doi10.5271/sjweh.3869
local.identifier.absseo920413 - Social Structure and Health
dc.date.updated2020-06-23T00:53:40Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Too_Is_the_association_between_2019.pdf409.51 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator