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Women

Charlesworth, Hilary

Description

This chapter offers an overview of UN approaches to women's lives in legal instruments. It begins by describing the engagement of women's organizations with international institutions from the start of the twentieth century, particularly the League of Nations. It then moves to UN treaties dealing with women. Its focus is the major UN treaty in this area, the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), and the work of its monitoring body, the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCharlesworth, Hilary
dc.contributor.editorChesterman, S
dc.contributor.editorMalone, D M
dc.contributor.editorVillalpando, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-11T02:00:11Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780190947842
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/209957
dc.description.abstractThis chapter offers an overview of UN approaches to women's lives in legal instruments. It begins by describing the engagement of women's organizations with international institutions from the start of the twentieth century, particularly the League of Nations. It then moves to UN treaties dealing with women. Its focus is the major UN treaty in this area, the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), and the work of its monitoring body, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (. The chapter also describes the extensive reservations states parties have entered to the Convention. It discusses the different accounts of nondiscrimination and equality that emerge in UN treaties. The international sphere illustrates the paradox for feminists of, on the one hand, insisting that differences between women and men should be irrelevant in claiming political rights; while, on the other hand, acting in the name of the category of women, thus bolstering the idea of difference. One strand of provisions in UN treaties aims to eradicate differences in the treatment of women, compared to men. Another strand has sought to recognize the particularity of women's lives, calling for special treatment and often endorsing a rather limited notion of womanhood in the process. These two strands coexist and are regularly included in the same treaty, even though they can be in normative tension.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofThe Oxford Handbook of United Nations Treaties
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved
dc.titleWomen
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor180116 - International Law (excl. International Trade Law)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1099631xPUB11
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCharlesworth, Hilary, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage249
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage266
local.identifier.doi10.1093/law/9780190947842.003.0015
local.identifier.absseo940499 - Justice and the Law not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2020-06-07T08:20:30Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew York
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
dc.provenance© Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Handbooks Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).
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