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Assessing the Role of Health Behaviors, Socioeconomic Status, and Cumulative Stress for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Obesity

Cuevas, Adolfo; Chen, Ruijia; Slopen, Natalie; Thurber, Katherine; Wilson, Norbert; Economos, Christina; Williams, David R

Description

Objective: This study aimed to examine the explanatory role of health behaviors, socioeconomic position (SEP), and psychosocial stressors on racial/ethnic obesity disparities in a multiethnic and multiracial sample of adults. Methods: Using data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Study (2001-2003), Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis was conducted to quantify the extent to which health behaviors (fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity), SEP, and cumulative stressors...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCuevas, Adolfo
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ruijia
dc.contributor.authorSlopen, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorThurber, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Norbert
dc.contributor.authorEconomos, Christina
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, David R
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-07T02:00:18Z
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/209350
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study aimed to examine the explanatory role of health behaviors, socioeconomic position (SEP), and psychosocial stressors on racial/ethnic obesity disparities in a multiethnic and multiracial sample of adults. Methods: Using data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Study (2001-2003), Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis was conducted to quantify the extent to which health behaviors (fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity), SEP, and cumulative stressors (e.g., perceived discrimination, financial strain) each explained differences in obesity prevalence in Black, US-born Hispanic, and non-US-born Hispanic compared with non-Hispanic White participants. Results: SEP and health behaviors did not explain obesity differences between racial/ethnic minorities and White individuals. Having high levels of stress in four or more domains explained 4.46% of the differences between Black and White individuals, whereas having high levels of stress in three domains significantly explained 14.13% of differences between US-born Hispanic and White. Together, the predictors explained less than 20% of differences between any racial/ethnic minority group and White individuals. Conclusions: Exposure to stressors may play a role in obesity disparities, particularly among Black and US-born Hispanic individuals. Other obesity-related risk factors need to be examined to understand the underlying mechanisms explaining obesity disparities.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe development of the manuscript was partially supported by Cancer Disparities Research Network/Geographic Management Program (GMaP) Region 4 funded by 3 P30 CA006927-52S2 and by Clinical & Translational Science Institute Mentored Career Development Award (KL2 TR002545). The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2019 The Obesity Society
dc.sourceObesity
dc.titleAssessing the Role of Health Behaviors, Socioeconomic Status, and Cumulative Stress for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Obesity
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6269649xPUB861
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCuevas, Adolfo, Tufts University
local.contributor.affiliationChen, Ruijia, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
local.contributor.affiliationSlopen, Natalie, University of Maryland
local.contributor.affiliationThurber, Katherine, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWilson, Norbert, Tufts University
local.contributor.affiliationEconomos, Christina, Tufts University
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, David R, Harvard University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage161
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage170
local.identifier.doi10.1002/oby.22648
local.identifier.absseo920401 - Behaviour and Health
dc.date.updated2020-05-17T08:23:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85076913391
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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