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Side-Splitting Amusement: On comic scientists - the sciency type of violent clowns?

Jurgens, Anna-Sophie

Description

Focusing on comic scientists in the popular cultural matrix around 1900 and the early 20th century, the heyday of circus arts, this paper explores an ongoing aesthetic tradition of comic pathological body aesthetics emerging from comic mad scientists and violent Frankensteinian clowns in literature and film. It clarifies that in circus contexts the Frankenstein-theme is terribly (morbidly) funny, and explores the reasons that make it so. Investigating a mosaic of historical examples, it builds...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJurgens, Anna-Sophie
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-02T23:46:27Z
dc.identifier.issn2040-610X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/209267
dc.description.abstractFocusing on comic scientists in the popular cultural matrix around 1900 and the early 20th century, the heyday of circus arts, this paper explores an ongoing aesthetic tradition of comic pathological body aesthetics emerging from comic mad scientists and violent Frankensteinian clowns in literature and film. It clarifies that in circus contexts the Frankenstein-theme is terribly (morbidly) funny, and explores the reasons that make it so. Investigating a mosaic of historical examples, it builds on and extends Roslynn Haynes's analysis of a raft of scientist stereotypes and their impact on a Western cultural imaginary that feeds back into how the workings and operations of science are generally received. Rounding up a number of cultural connections and texts featuring scientist characters within the general framework of popular entertainment, the paper introduces the cultural stereotype of the comic scientist and further explores its attributes and characteristics.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.rights© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceComedy Studies
dc.titleSide-Splitting Amusement: On comic scientists - the sciency type of violent clowns?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor200299 - Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6340640xPUB5
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJurgens, Anna-Sophie, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage121
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage132
local.identifier.doi10.1080/2040610X.2019.1692538
dc.date.updated2022-06-12T08:16:35Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85076392979
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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