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Meritocratic Representation

Pettit, Philip

Description

No individual or body can count as the representative of another unless selected or authorized to act in that role. The representative speaks and acts in the name of another individual or group, and this, unlike speaking or acting on another's behalf - say, speaking or acting as a self-appointed advocate - requires authorization in the role. This authorization raises two questions. First, is it legitimate? Is the representative selected by a suitable agent or agency and under suitable rules?...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPettit, Philip
dc.contributor.editorDaniel A Bell
dc.contributor.editorChenyang Li
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:23:53Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781107623774
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/20911
dc.description.abstractNo individual or body can count as the representative of another unless selected or authorized to act in that role. The representative speaks and acts in the name of another individual or group, and this, unlike speaking or acting on another's behalf - say, speaking or acting as a self-appointed advocate - requires authorization in the role. This authorization raises two questions. First, is it legitimate? Is the representative selected by a suitable agent or agency and under suitable rules? Second, is it motivated? Is the selection made on the grounds that the candidate is distinctively eligible or qualified for a representative role? Under electoral arrangements, authorization comes via the selection of the representative, directly or indirectly, on the basis of a popular vote. And it is the disposition to be responsive to the attitudes of electors, which that very mode of selection is designed to encourage, that qualifies the candidate to serve in a representative role. The candidate or deputy may be responsive at only a general level to the attitudes of electors - say, to their values or interests - or responsive to detailed wishes and instructions; in the first case, such a deputy will count as a trustee, in the second as a delegate.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofThe East Asian Challenge for Democracy: Political Meritocracy in Comparative Perspective
dc.relation.isversionofFirst Edition
dc.source.urihttp://www.cambridge.org/au/academic/subjects/politics-international-relations/political-theory/east-asian-challenge-democracy-political-meritocracy-comparative-perspective
dc.titleMeritocratic Representation
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor160609 - Political Theory and Political Philosophy
local.identifier.ariespublicationU5395746xPUB14
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPettit, Philip, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage138
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage160
local.identifier.doi/10.1017/CBO9781139814850.007
local.identifier.absseo970122 - Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:37:41Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationUSA
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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