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Convergent evolution of a vertebrate-like methylome in a marine sponge

de Mendoza, Alex; Hatleberg , William L.; Pang, Kevin; Leininger, Sven; Bogdanovic, Ozren; Pflueger, Jahnvi; Buckberry , Sam; Technau , Ulrich; Hejnol , Andreas; Adamska, Maja; Degnan , Bernard M.

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Vertebrates have highly methylated genomes at CpG positions, whereas invertebrates have sparsely methylated genomes. This increase in methylation content is considered a major regulatory innovation of vertebrate genomes. However, here we report that a sponge, proposed as the potential sister group to the rest of animals, has a highly methylated genome. Despite major differences in genome size and architecture, we find similarities between the independent acquisitions of the hypermethylated...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorde Mendoza, Alex
dc.contributor.authorHatleberg , William L.
dc.contributor.authorPang, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorLeininger, Sven
dc.contributor.authorBogdanovic, Ozren
dc.contributor.authorPflueger, Jahnvi
dc.contributor.authorBuckberry , Sam
dc.contributor.authorTechnau , Ulrich
dc.contributor.authorHejnol , Andreas
dc.contributor.authorAdamska, Maja
dc.contributor.authorDegnan , Bernard M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-17T00:54:15Z
dc.identifier.issn2397-334X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/206309
dc.description.abstractVertebrates have highly methylated genomes at CpG positions, whereas invertebrates have sparsely methylated genomes. This increase in methylation content is considered a major regulatory innovation of vertebrate genomes. However, here we report that a sponge, proposed as the potential sister group to the rest of animals, has a highly methylated genome. Despite major differences in genome size and architecture, we find similarities between the independent acquisitions of the hypermethylated state. Both lineages show genome-wide CpG depletion, conserved strong transcription factor methyl-sensitivity and developmental methylation dynamics at 5-hydroxymethylcytosine enriched regions. Together, our findings trace back patterns associated with DNA methylation in vertebrates to the early steps of animal evolution. Thus, the sponge methylome challenges previous hypotheses concerning the uniqueness of vertebrate genome hypermethylation and its implications for regulatory complexity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence programme in Plant Energy Biology (grant no. CE140100008). R.L. was supported by a Sylvia and Charles Viertel Senior Medical Research Fellowship, ARC Future Fellowship (no. FT120100862) and Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Scholarship. S.M.D. and B.M.D. were supported by grants from the ARC (grant nos. DP160100573 and DP170102353). Research in A.H.'s group was supported by the European Research Council Community's Framework Program Horizon 2020 (2014–2020) ERC grant agreement (no. 648861) and an NSF IRFP Postdoctoral Fellowship (no. 1158629) to K.P. A.d.M. was funded by an EMBO long-term fellowship (no. ALTF 144-2014). U.T. was funded by a grant from the Austrian Science Fund FWF (grant no. P27353).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rights© 2019 The Author(s)
dc.sourceNature Ecology & Evolution
dc.titleConvergent evolution of a vertebrate-like methylome in a marine sponge
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-08-16
dc.date.issued2019-09-26
local.identifier.absfor060405 - Gene Expression (incl. Microarray and other genome-wide approaches)
local.identifier.absfor060802 - Animal Cell and Molecular Biology
local.identifier.absfor060305 - Evolution of Developmental Systems
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5786633xPUB1067
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.nature.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationde Mendoza, Alex, The University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationHatleberg , William L., The University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationPang, Kevin, University of Bergen
local.contributor.affiliationLeininger, Sven, Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology
local.contributor.affiliationBogdanovic, Ozren, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationPflueger, Jahnvi, The University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationBuckberry , Sam, The University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationTechnau , Ulrich, University of Vienna
local.contributor.affiliationHejnol , Andreas, University of Bergen
local.contributor.affiliationAdamska, Maja, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDegnan , Bernard M., The University of Queensland
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/CE140100008
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT120100862
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160100573
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP170102353
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1464
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1473
local.identifier.doi10.1038/s41559-019-0983-2
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-04-05T08:18:49Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85072703497
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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