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State fragility and international recognition

Lemay-Hébert, Nicolas

Description

This chapter considers how the evolving norms and practices of international recognition relate to the �state fragility� policy agenda. First, the chapter discusses contemporary state failure and state fragility discussion, introducing the �consensual� definition of state fragility and its origins. Second, it directly links the (modern) state fragility discussion with international recognition and statebuilding issues. The chapter shows that the conventional criteria for statehood do not...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLemay-Hébert, Nicolas
dc.contributor.editorGëzim Visoka
dc.contributor.editorJohn Doyle
dc.contributor.editorEdward Newman
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T00:14:16Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780815354871
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/205568
dc.description.abstractThis chapter considers how the evolving norms and practices of international recognition relate to the �state fragility� policy agenda. First, the chapter discusses contemporary state failure and state fragility discussion, introducing the �consensual� definition of state fragility and its origins. Second, it directly links the (modern) state fragility discussion with international recognition and statebuilding issues. The chapter shows that the conventional criteria for statehood do not include standards relating to the capacity of state institutions and contain no formal provisions for withdrawing statehood in the event of failure to meet objective standards of state capacity or performance. Nevertheless, there have been academic debates about the possibility of the �decertification� of statehood when states do not meet normative standards set by the �international community�. Finally, the chapter closes on the very recent discussion of state fragility, tying the concept with resilience and risk.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.relation.ispartofRoutledge Handbook of State Recognition
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© 2020 selection and editorial matter, Gëzim Visoka, John Doyle, Edward Newman; individual chapters, the contributors
dc.source.urihttps://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Handbook-of-State-Recognition-1st-Edition/Visoka-Doyle-Newman/p/book/9780815354871
dc.titleState fragility and international recognition
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8701575xPUB420
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLemay-Hebert, Nicolas, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage306
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage315
local.identifier.doi/10.4324/9781351131759-24
local.identifier.absseo940399 - International Relations not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2020-11-22T07:54:49Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationAbingdon
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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