Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Characteristics of Campylobacter Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Australia, 2001 to 2016

Moffatt, Cameron; Fearnley, Emily; Bell, Robert; Wright, Rosemary; Gregory, Joy; Sloan-Gardner, Timothy; Kirk, Martyn; Stafford, R

Description

Campylobacter spp. are a globally important cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, with Australia experiencing higher rates of illness than many comparable high-income countries. Despite the high disease incidence, outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Australia are infrequently detected and reported. We examined the epidemiology of Campylobacter outbreaks in Australia, with particular emphasis on assessing transmission routes and evidence as reported during public health investigations. A national...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoffatt, Cameron
dc.contributor.authorFearnley, Emily
dc.contributor.authorBell, Robert
dc.contributor.authorWright, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Joy
dc.contributor.authorSloan-Gardner, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Martyn
dc.contributor.authorStafford, R
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-18T01:39:46Z
dc.identifier.issn1535-3141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/205291
dc.description.abstractCampylobacter spp. are a globally important cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, with Australia experiencing higher rates of illness than many comparable high-income countries. Despite the high disease incidence, outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Australia are infrequently detected and reported. We examined the epidemiology of Campylobacter outbreaks in Australia, with particular emphasis on assessing transmission routes and evidence as reported during public health investigations. A national register of enteric and foodborne disease outbreaks was used to summarize data on all Campylobacter outbreaks reported in Australia between 2001 and 2016. Outbreak data were reviewed and analyzed for trends over time. Additional information was sought from state and territory epidemiologists, to validate transmission routes. A total of 84 Campylobacter outbreaks were reported, with 51 (61%) being classified as foodborne. Specific food vehicles were identified for 33 (65%) outbreaks, with 28 (85%) implicating chicken or chicken-containing dishes. Although no increase in the proportion of foodborne Campylobacter outbreaks was observed, examination of specific food vehicles demonstrated a significant increase in outbreaks because of poultry-liver containing foods (p = 0.04). One quarter of all 1042 outbreak-associated cases occurred in aged-care facilities (ACFs), including 17 associated hospitalizations and three deaths. After review of evidence data, 23 outbreaks (27%) were determined to have an unknown route of transmission, including 10 (43%) outbreaks occurring in ACFs. Campylobacter spp. remain a less commonly reported cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in Australia. Although many reported outbreaks can be linked to foodborne transmission, over a quarter were unable to identify either a food vehicle or transmission source, particularly for outbreaks occurring in aged care. Increased efforts to improve evidence collection and understanding of transmission dynamics for outbreaks of campylobacteriosis, particularly in aged care, are required.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert Inc.
dc.rights© Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
dc.sourceFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
dc.titleCharacteristics of Campylobacter Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Australia, 2001 to 2016
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor110307 - Gastroenterology and Hepatology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU1070655xPUB164
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.liebertpub.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMoffatt, Cameron, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFearnley, Emily, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBell, Robert, Queensland Health
local.contributor.affiliationWright, Rosemary, Australian Government Department of Health
local.contributor.affiliationGregory, Joy, VIC Department of Human Services
local.contributor.affiliationSloan-Gardner, Timothy, ACT Health
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Martyn, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationStafford , R , OzFoodNet Communicable Diseases Branch
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage308
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage315
local.identifier.doi10.1089/fpd.2019.2731
local.identifier.absseo920404 - Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
dc.date.updated2020-01-19T07:25:16Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
fpd.2019.2731.pdf110.4 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator