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Female board representation and corporate performance: an Australian perspective

Bayly, Nicholas

Description

This thesis contributes to the extensive literature on female board representation and corporate performance. It comprises three papers that present new research on this topic, primarily in an Australian context. In Chapter 2, I provide a thorough overview of the current state of knowledge, detailing a diverse array of methodologies and findings, and emphasising the endogeneity issues that plague the literature. I demonstrate that, despite many claims to the contrary in the popular press,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBayly, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-14T04:41:45Z
dc.date.available2020-06-14T04:41:45Z
dc.identifier.otherb7149859x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/205026
dc.description.abstractThis thesis contributes to the extensive literature on female board representation and corporate performance. It comprises three papers that present new research on this topic, primarily in an Australian context. In Chapter 2, I provide a thorough overview of the current state of knowledge, detailing a diverse array of methodologies and findings, and emphasising the endogeneity issues that plague the literature. I demonstrate that, despite many claims to the contrary in the popular press, there is no genuine consensus in the literature that women's presence or appointment as corporate directors either positively or negatively influences firms' financial performance. In Chapter 3, I generate a new dataset from records of female appointments to non-executive directorships at companies listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. I use this dataset to perform an event study examining the effect of these announcements on share price, and implement a range of parametric and non-parametric tests. The results fail to provide consistent evidence of a general effect; they also suggest no such effect is present for large firms specifically. In Chapter 4, I use Australian data to replicate, then extend two significant studies examining the link between women's presence on boards and a range of accounting and market-based measures of financial performance. I also briefly examine gendered differences in board members' remuneration and attendance. The results differ substantially according to a range of methodological choices (e.g. controls, modelling technique and sample group), but generally do not support the conclusion that female board representation affects financial performance.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.titleFemale board representation and corporate performance: an Australian perspective
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorBreunig, Robert
local.contributor.supervisorcontactu9809765@anu.edu.au
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5ef32c0f94b81
local.identifier.proquestNo
local.thesisANUonly.author37e94cd9-f87e-434e-9731-3d8a9141f3fd
local.thesisANUonly.title000000014492_TC_1
local.thesisANUonly.keya227787a-b031-a2df-ebf2-d3115effc6f1
local.mintdoimint
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