Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Response of Southern Ocean Ventilation to Changes in Midlatitude Westerly Winds

Waugh, Darryn; Hogg, Andrew; Spence, Paul; England, Matthew; Haine, T.W.N.

Description

Changes in ventilation of the Southern Hemisphere oceans in response to changes in midlatitude westerly winds are examined by analyzing the ideal age tracer from global eddy-permitting ocean–ice model simulations in which there is an abrupt increase and/or a meridional shift in the winds. The age response in mode and intermediate waters is found to be close to linear; the response of a combined increase and shift of peak winds is similar to the sum of the individual responses to an increase...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWaugh, Darryn
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Paul
dc.contributor.authorEngland, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorHaine, T.W.N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-03T04:46:52Z
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/204794
dc.description.abstractChanges in ventilation of the Southern Hemisphere oceans in response to changes in midlatitude westerly winds are examined by analyzing the ideal age tracer from global eddy-permitting ocean–ice model simulations in which there is an abrupt increase and/or a meridional shift in the winds. The age response in mode and intermediate waters is found to be close to linear; the response of a combined increase and shift of peak winds is similar to the sum of the individual responses to an increase and a shift. Further, a barotropic response, following Sverdrup balance, can explain much of the age response to the changes in wind stress. There are similar peak decreases (of around 50 years) in the ideal age for a 40% increase or 2.58 poleward shift in the wind stress. However, while the age decreases throughout the thermocline for an increase in the winds, for a poleward shift in the winds the age increases in the north part of the thermocline and there are decreases in age only south of 358S. As a consequence, the change in the volume of young water differs, with a 15% increase in the volume of water with ages younger than 50 years for a 40% increase in the winds but essentially no change in this volume for a 2.58 shift. As ventilation plays a critical role in the uptake of carbon and heat, these results suggest that the storage of anthropogenic carbon and heat in mode and intermediate waters will likely increase with a strengthening of the winds, but will be much less sensitive to a meridional shift in the peak wind stress.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Society
dc.rights© 2019 American Meteorological Society.
dc.rights2019 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).
dc.sourceJournal of Climate
dc.titleResponse of Southern Ocean Ventilation to Changes in Midlatitude Westerly Winds
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor040503 - Physical Oceanography
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB4534
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWaugh, Darryn, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationHogg, Andrew, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSpence, Paul, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationEngland, Matthew, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationHaine, T.W.N., Johns Hopkins University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE150100223
local.bibliographicCitation.issue17
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage5345
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage5361
local.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0039.1
local.identifier.absseo960304 - Climate Variability (excl. Social Impacts)
dc.date.updated2019-12-19T07:16:08Z
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000477657300001
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0894-8755/..."author can archive publisher's version/PDF. 6 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 3/06/2020).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Waugh_Response_of_Southern_Ocean_2019.pdf7.98 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator