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A Chasing After the Wind: Experience in Computer-supported Group Musicmaking

Swift, Ben; Gardner, Henry; Riddell, Alistair

Description

Improvisational group musics, such as jazz, have their own cultures and conventions of musical interaction. One characteristic of this interaction is the primacy of the experience over the musical artefact - in some sense the sound created is not as important as the feeling of being ‘in the groove’. As computing devices infiltrate creative, open-ended task domains, what can HCI learn from improvisational group musics? How do we design systems where the goal is not an artefact but a felt...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSwift, Ben
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Henry
dc.contributor.authorRiddell, Alistair
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T06:29:16Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T06:29:16Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/204564
dc.description.abstractImprovisational group musics, such as jazz, have their own cultures and conventions of musical interaction. One characteristic of this interaction is the primacy of the experience over the musical artefact - in some sense the sound created is not as important as the feeling of being ‘in the groove’. As computing devices infiltrate creative, open-ended task domains, what can HCI learn from improvisational group musics? How do we design systems where the goal is not an artefact but a felt experience? This position paper examines these issues in light of an experiment involving ‘Viscotheque’, a novel group music-making environment based on the iPhone. Some results are presented, as well as a discussion of the difficult problem of reconciling the participant’s (subjective) descriptions of the felt experience with the detailed interaction data logged by the system.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.rights© The Author(s)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.source.uriProceedings of "When words fail: What can music interaction tell us about HCI?" workshop at British HCI
dc.subjectimprovisation
dc.subjectmusicmaking
dc.subjectmeasurement
dc.titleA Chasing After the Wind: Experience in Computer-supported Group Musicmaking
dc.typeConference paper
dc.date.issued2011-05-08
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSwift, B., Research School of Computer Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationGardner, H., Research School of Computer Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationRiddell, A., Research School of Computer Science, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5eccf07a01b95
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceCopyright retained by author(s).
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC 4.0
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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