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Applying an individual-differences lens to understanding human cognition

Goodhew, Stephanie Catherine

Description

The study of human cognition has traditionally sought to identify contextual factors that affect how humans perceive, attend to, think or reason about, or remember information from the world around them. Typically, such factors are varied experimentally in laboratory studies. For example, it is well documented that humans fail to notice important visual information in their environment, a phenomenon known as inattentional blindness (IB). Experimental studies have sought to identify the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGoodhew, Stephanie Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-06T03:13:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/203816
dc.description.abstractThe study of human cognition has traditionally sought to identify contextual factors that affect how humans perceive, attend to, think or reason about, or remember information from the world around them. Typically, such factors are varied experimentally in laboratory studies. For example, it is well documented that humans fail to notice important visual information in their environment, a phenomenon known as inattentional blindness (IB). Experimental studies have sought to identify the contextual factors that render individuals most susceptible to IB, by comparing IB rates in one experimental condition versus another. This is typical of the traditional approach to the scientific study of cognition in both cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, which has relied upon theories and frameworks for analysing data that focus on levels of performance averaged across individuals. As a consequence, variation that is unique to particular individuals or groups is treated as nuisance variance. While this approach has important utility and much knowledge has been gained from it, it can obscure other important aspects of the phenomenon. For instance, even given the identical physical information, some individuals experience IB whereas others do not. Why? Can this variance be meaningfully explained by individual or group factors? These are the sorts of questions that are beginning to be addressed more commonly in the science of cognition, and this is why this Special Issue is a timely contribution.
dc.description.sponsorshipFT170100021
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2020 Elsevier B.V
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceConsciousness and cognition
dc.subjectindividual differences
dc.subjectcognition
dc.titleApplying an individual-differences lens to understanding human cognition
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume79
dc.date.issued2020-03
local.identifier.absfor1701 - Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu6048437xPUB882
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationGoodhew, S. C., Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2022-03-30
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT170100021
local.identifier.essn1090-2376
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage102883
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.concog.2020.102883
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1053-8100/..."Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of 24 months. Author's post-print must be released with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License" from Sherpa/Romeo (as at 6/05/2020)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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