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Life-history phenotypes in a live-bearing fish Brachyrhaphis episcopi living under different predator regimes: seasonal effects?

Jennions, Michael; Wong, Bob B M; Cowling, Ann; Donnelly, Christine

Description

Several key life-history attributes in a tropical live-bearing fish, Brachyrhaphis episcopi, have previously been shown to differ between populations that co-occur with large predatory fish (Characin sites) and those that do not (Rivulus sites). Here we show that differences between Characin and Rivulus localities are also repeatable over time; patterns observed in the wet season also persisted during the dry. Both sexes reached maturity at a smaller size at Characin sites. Although there was...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWong, Bob B M
dc.contributor.authorCowling, Ann
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:21:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0378-1909
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/20291
dc.description.abstractSeveral key life-history attributes in a tropical live-bearing fish, Brachyrhaphis episcopi, have previously been shown to differ between populations that co-occur with large predatory fish (Characin sites) and those that do not (Rivulus sites). Here we show that differences between Characin and Rivulus localities are also repeatable over time; patterns observed in the wet season also persisted during the dry. Both sexes reached maturity at a smaller size at Characin sites. Although there was no difference in fecundity between larger females living in different predator communities, smaller females at Characin sites produced more offspring. Females also produced smaller offspring at Characin localities. These differences are remarkably similar to those reported in two other species of live-bearing fish, B. rhabdophora and Poecilia reticulata suggesting possible convergent adaptation in life-history strategies due to predator-mediated effects or correlates thereof. We also found seasonal changes in life-history traits that were independent of predator community. In the wet season, mature males were larger, females allocated more to reproduction, and offspring mass was also greater. The results of our study generate testable predictions using B. episcopi to further our understanding of life-history evolution.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
dc.subjectKeywords: fecundity; fish; life history trait; predator; seasonality; sexual maturity; Brachyrhaphis episcopi; Cyprinodontiformes; Poecilia reticulata; Rivulus Convergent evolution; Guppy; Life-history strategy; Predation; Reproduction; Seasonality
dc.titleLife-history phenotypes in a live-bearing fish Brachyrhaphis episcopi living under different predator regimes: seasonal effects?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume76
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor060308 - Life Histories
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB11
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWong, Bob B M, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationCowling, Ann, Administrative Division, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDonnelly, Christine, Administrative Division, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage211
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage219
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10641-006-9022-7
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T09:04:19Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33748503168
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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