Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The proportion of dementia attributable to common modifiable lifestyle factors in Barbados

Ashby-Mitchell, Kimberly; Burns, Richard; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Objective. To understand what number and proportion of dementia cases in Barbados are attributable to modifiable lifestyle factors and what effect a reduction in these risk factors would have on future dementia prevalence. Methods. This was an observational study using Levin’s Attributable Risk formula, which assumes independence of risk factors, to calculate the population attributable risk (PAR) of dementia (all-cause) for six risk factors: midlife obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, low...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAshby-Mitchell, Kimberly
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Richard
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T03:42:49Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T03:42:49Z
dc.identifier.issn1020-4989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/202790
dc.description.abstractObjective. To understand what number and proportion of dementia cases in Barbados are attributable to modifiable lifestyle factors and what effect a reduction in these risk factors would have on future dementia prevalence. Methods. This was an observational study using Levin’s Attributable Risk formula, which assumes independence of risk factors, to calculate the population attributable risk (PAR) of dementia (all-cause) for six risk factors: midlife obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, low educational attainment, diabetes mellitus, and midlife hypertension in Barbados. A recently-published, modified formula was utilized to account for non- independence of risk factors using secondary data for Barbados. The number and proportion of dementia cases attributable to each risk factor and to all risk factors combined were computed, as was the effect that any reduction in these risk factors might have on future dementia prevalence. Results. Accounting for the fact that risk factors do not operate independently, 50.9% (1 526 cases) were attributable to the combined effect of the six risk factors under study. According to the analysis, if each risk factor were reduced by 5% – 20% per decade, dementia prevalence could be 3.3% – 31.8% lower by 2050. Conclusion. Using a largely theoretical model, the six modifiable lifestyle factors were estimated to be attributable to 50.9% of dementia cases in Barbados. Since the risk factors have much in common, any intervention that targets one of them could significantly reduce future dementia prevalence.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory; CE110001029), Australian Research Council (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory; Fellowship #120100227) and by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC; Canberra, Australian Capital Territory; Fellowship #1002560 and APP1079438). We also acknowledge support from the NHMRC Dementia Collaborative Research Centres (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPan American Health Organization/Organizacion Panamericana de la Salud
dc.rights© 2018
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
dc.sourceRevista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health
dc.titleThe proportion of dementia attributable to common modifiable lifestyle factors in Barbados
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume42
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111702 - Aged Health Care
local.identifier.absfor111710 - Health Counselling
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB1421
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.who.int/en/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAshby-Mitchell, Kimberly , Caribean Public Health Agency
local.contributor.affiliationBurns, Richard, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/CE110001029
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT120100227
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage7
local.identifier.doi10.26633/RPSP.2018.17
local.identifier.absseo920503 - Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
local.identifier.absseo920502 - Health Related to Ageing
dc.date.updated2019-11-25T07:51:22Z
local.identifier.thomsonID000441146400009
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 IGO License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. No modifications or commercial use of this article are permitted. In any reproduction of this article there should not be any suggestion that PAHO or this article endorse any specific organization or products. The use of the PAHO logo is not permitted. This notice should be preserved along with the article’s original URL.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 IGO License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Ashby-Mitchell_The_proportion_of_dementia_2018.pdf1.84 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator