Skip navigation
Skip navigation

India's depleting groundwater: When science meets policy

Grafton, Quentin; Chindarkar, Namrata

Description

A commonly applied policy to India's ongoing depletion of groundwater is feeder separation. Introduced in Gujarat as the Jyotigram Yojana (JGY) scheme, it provides a separate and rationed electricity supply to farmers and an unrationed power supply to non‐agricultural users. JGY is claimed to increase groundwater storage. By using Gujarat district‐level data from 1996 to 2011 and by separately applying difference‐in‐differences and Bayesian regressions, we find that groundwater storage has...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGrafton, Quentin
dc.contributor.authorChindarkar, Namrata
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-27T00:42:38Z
dc.date.available2020-03-27T00:42:38Z
dc.identifier.issn2050-2680
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/202483
dc.description.abstractA commonly applied policy to India's ongoing depletion of groundwater is feeder separation. Introduced in Gujarat as the Jyotigram Yojana (JGY) scheme, it provides a separate and rationed electricity supply to farmers and an unrationed power supply to non‐agricultural users. JGY is claimed to increase groundwater storage. By using Gujarat district‐level data from 1996 to 2011 and by separately applying difference‐in‐differences and Bayesian regressions, we find that groundwater storage has continued to decrease with JGY. We contend that our empirical results show that JGY has been implemented without adequate consideration of (1) a publication bias whereby researchers have a greater likelihood of having their results published if they are statistically significant and show a positive outcome and (2) a ‘barrier’ effect such that communicating evidence across science and policy divides means that evidence may not be accepted, even when true, and this limits policy advice and options.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge the financial assistance of the UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Governance at the Australian National University and the support of the Institute for Water Policy at the National University of Singapore
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.sourceAsia & The Pacific Policy Studies
dc.titleIndia's depleting groundwater: When science meets policy
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor140205 - Environment and Resource Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB591
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGrafton, R Quentin, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationChindarkar, Namrata, National University of Singapore
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage108
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage124
local.identifier.doi10.1002/app5.269
dc.date.updated2019-11-25T07:44:58Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85059638265
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2019 The Authors. Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd and Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Grafton_India%27s_depleting_groundwater%3A_2019.pdf771.34 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator