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Marsupial chromosomics: bridging the gap between genomes and chromosomes

Deakin, Janine; Potter, Sally

Description

Marsupials have unique features that make them particularly interesting to study, and sequencing of marsupial genomes is helping to understand their evolution. A decade ago, it was a huge feat to sequence the first marsupial genome. Now, the advances in sequencing technology have made the sequencing of many more marsupial genomes possible. However, the DNA sequence is only one component of the structures it is packaged into: chromosomes. Knowing the arrangement of the DNA sequence on each...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDeakin, Janine
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Sally
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-23T00:03:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1031-3613
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/202425
dc.description.abstractMarsupials have unique features that make them particularly interesting to study, and sequencing of marsupial genomes is helping to understand their evolution. A decade ago, it was a huge feat to sequence the first marsupial genome. Now, the advances in sequencing technology have made the sequencing of many more marsupial genomes possible. However, the DNA sequence is only one component of the structures it is packaged into: chromosomes. Knowing the arrangement of the DNA sequence on each chromosome is essential for a genome assembly to be used to its full potential. The importance of combining sequence information with cytogenetics has previously been demonstrated for rapidly evolving regions of the genome, such as the sex chromosomes, as well as for reconstructing the ancestral marsupial karyotype and understanding the chromosome rearrangements involved in the Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease. Despite the recent advances in sequencing technology assisting in genome assembly, physical anchoring of the sequence to chromosomes is required to achieve a chromosome-level assembly. Once chromosome-level assemblies are achieved for more marsupials, we will be able to investigate changes in the packaging and interactions between chromosomes to gain an understanding of the role genome architecture has played during marsupial evolution.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors’ rock wallaby research is supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP160100187) awarded to Janine E. Deakin, Jason Bragg, Craig Moritz, Mark Eldridge and Mark Kirkpatrick.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCSLI Publications
dc.rights© CSIRO 2019
dc.sourceReproduction, Fertility and Development
dc.titleMarsupial chromosomics: bridging the gap between genomes and chromosomes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume31
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor060407 - Genome Structure and Regulation
local.identifier.absfor060408 - Genomics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB5006
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.publish.csiro.au/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDeakin, Janine, University of Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationPotter, Sally, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160100187
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1189
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1202
local.identifier.doi10.1071/RD18201
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2019-11-25T07:44:12Z
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000472464300001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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