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Australia and New Zealand

France, Malcolm; Freeman Bain, Simon; Lidbury, Brett

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Animal-based toxicology is only conducted on a small scale in Australia and New Zealand. Initiatives to develop alternatives to animal tests have arisen most often in the economically important agriculture sector, and in environmental monitoring. Stringent controls restricting the use of the Draize and LD50 tests emerged as far back as 1985. While the animal testing of cosmetics is banned in New Zealand, and a similar ban is expected soon in Australia, these moves are considered to be largely...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFrance, Malcolm
dc.contributor.authorFreeman Bain, Simon
dc.contributor.authorLidbury, Brett
dc.contributor.editorMichael Balls
dc.contributor.editorRobert Combes
dc.contributor.editorAndrew Worth
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T23:44:07Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780128136973
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/200971
dc.description.abstractAnimal-based toxicology is only conducted on a small scale in Australia and New Zealand. Initiatives to develop alternatives to animal tests have arisen most often in the economically important agriculture sector, and in environmental monitoring. Stringent controls restricting the use of the Draize and LD50 tests emerged as far back as 1985. While the animal testing of cosmetics is banned in New Zealand, and a similar ban is expected soon in Australia, these moves are considered to be largely symbolic because there is virtually no history of such testing in either country. A 1989 Australian Senate report recommended the establishment of a government fund for research into alternatives, but no such entity yet exists in Australia or New Zealand. Progress in New Zealand may be facilitated in some areas because regulatory control lies within a single layer of government, whereas in Australia, state boundaries can be an impediment.
dc.format.extent7 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.relation.ispartofThe History of Alternative Test Methods in Toxicology. History of Toxicology and Environmental Health
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© 2019 Elsevier Inc
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectAlternative method
dc.subjectAnimal testing
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectCosmetics
dc.subjectEnvironment
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectRegulatory toxicology
dc.subjectThree Rs
dc.titleAustralia and New Zealand
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor111506 - Toxicology (incl. Clinical Toxicology)
local.identifier.ariespublicationU1070655xPUB15
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/books-and-journals/academic-press
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFrance, Malcolm, Laboratory Animal Care and Management
local.contributor.affiliationFreeman Bain, Simon, Research Ethics
local.contributor.affiliationLidbury, Brett, College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage71
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage77
local.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-813697-3.00010-X
local.identifier.absseo920599 - Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2019-11-25T07:27:41Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationUnited Kingdom
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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