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Do psychosocial job stressors influence mental health service use? Evidence from an Australian cohort

Milner, A; Petrie, Dennis; LaMontagne, Anthony; Butterworth, Peter

Description

Objectives There is strong evidence of a relationship between psychosocial job stressors and mental health at the population level. There has been no longitudinal research on whether the experience of job stressors is also associated with greater mental health service use. We seek to fill this gap. Methods The Household Income Labour Dynamics in Australia survey cohort was used to assess the relationship between exposure to self-reported psychosocial job quality and reporting attendance at a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMilner, A
dc.contributor.authorPetrie, Dennis
dc.contributor.authorLaMontagne, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-13T03:41:45Z
dc.identifier.issn1351-0711
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/197043
dc.description.abstractObjectives There is strong evidence of a relationship between psychosocial job stressors and mental health at the population level. There has been no longitudinal research on whether the experience of job stressors is also associated with greater mental health service use. We seek to fill this gap. Methods The Household Income Labour Dynamics in Australia survey cohort was used to assess the relationship between exposure to self-reported psychosocial job quality and reporting attendance at a mental health professional during the past 12 months. We adjusted for time-varying and time-invariant confounders. The study was conducted in 2009 and 2013. Results In the random effects logistic regression model, increasing exposure to psychosocial job stressors was associated with an increased odds of mental health service use after adjustment (one stressor: OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.56; two stressors: OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.73; three stressors: OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.28 to 2.57). However, once the between person effects were controlled in a fixed effects model, the within-person association between change in job stressors and change in mental health service use was estimated to be close to zero and not significant. Conclusions More work is needed to understand the relationship between job stressors and service use. However, when taken with past findings on job stressors and mental health, these findings highlight the importance of considering policy and clinical practice responses to adverse working contexts.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019
dc.sourceOccupational and Environmental Medicine
dc.titleDo psychosocial job stressors influence mental health service use? Evidence from an Australian cohort
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.notesThe version was submitted to the publisher when Peter Butterworth was affiliated with University of Melbourne.
local.identifier.citationvolume76
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor170106 - Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
local.identifier.absfor111705 - Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5786633xPUB784
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.bmj.com/company/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationMilner, A, The University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationPetrie, Dennis, Monash University Centre For Health Economics
local.contributor.affiliationLaMontagne, Anthony, Deakin University
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE150100309
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT130101444
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage295
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage301
local.identifier.doi10.1136/oemed-2018-105440
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
local.identifier.absseo920405 - Environmental Health
dc.date.updated2019-08-25T08:20:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85062674623
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.relation.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.provenance© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. http://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1351-0711/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 14/01/2020). This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1351-0711/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 14/01/2020). This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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