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A combined geochemical and mu CT study on the CO2 reactivity of Surat Basin reservoir and cap-rock cores: Porosity changes, mineral dissolution and fines migration

Pearce, J. K.; Dawson, G. K. W.; Golab, A.; Knuefing, Lydia; Sommacal, Silvano; Golding, S. D.; Rudolph, V.

Description

Geological storage of CO2 generally involves injection of a CO2 stream into a high porosity and permeability reservoir, contained by one or more overlying low permeability formations. Sandstone reservoirs and associated cap-rocks of targeted CO2 storage sites therefore have distinct properties such as porosity and mineral contents. Their geochemical response or reactivity to injected supercritical CO2 and associated changes in porosity, and permeability affecting scaling, mineral trapping,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPearce, J. K.
dc.contributor.authorDawson, G. K. W.
dc.contributor.authorGolab, A.
dc.contributor.authorKnuefing, Lydia
dc.contributor.authorSommacal, Silvano
dc.contributor.authorGolding, S. D.
dc.contributor.authorRudolph, V.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-09T04:23:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1750-5836
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/196760
dc.description.abstractGeological storage of CO2 generally involves injection of a CO2 stream into a high porosity and permeability reservoir, contained by one or more overlying low permeability formations. Sandstone reservoirs and associated cap-rocks of targeted CO2 storage sites therefore have distinct properties such as porosity and mineral contents. Their geochemical response or reactivity to injected supercritical CO2 and associated changes in porosity, and permeability affecting scaling, mineral trapping, injectivity, or migration can therefore be very different. Six drill core samples including quartz-rich sandstones, calcite cemented sandstones, and feldspar or clay-rich cap-rocks from a proposed demonstration site in the Surat Basin, Australia, were characterized before and after reaction with pure supercritical CO2 and low salinity formation water. The quartz-rich sandstones have low reactivity, and maintain high porosities with visible pore connectivity after reaction, they are unlikely to be affected by scaling. Kaolin and fine grain movement observed via μCT and SEM could have the potential to open or plug pores, potentially increasing or decreasing permeability and CO2 injectivity. Calcite cemented sandstones had the greatest measured change in porosity after reaction via calcite dissolution. Narrow angular channels were formed in the calcite cement around framework grains, extending through to the center of the sub-plug in the courser grained rock, and surface roughness increased. Solution pH was however quickly passivated. The highest concentrations of Ca, Mn, Sr, and Mg were released to solution from calcite dissolution. Clay (and feldspar) rich cap-rock core had mainly microporosity and the smallest initial pore throat diameters associated with clays. Small changes to μCT calculated porosities after reaction were related to a decrease in chlorite X-ray density, and dissolution of patchy carbonate minerals. Pores were disconnected in μCT images, except for some created horizontal connection along a sandy lamination in a cap-rock. Dissolved concentrations of Ca, Fe, Si, Sr, Mn, Li and Mg increased via dissolution of both carbonate and silicate minerals. Dissolved Ca, Fe, Mn and Mg from silicate minerals in the cap-rock were available for longer term mineral trapping of CO2. Potential increases in porosity and migration will be highest in the calcite cemented zones, while clay-rich cap-rocks could be expected to maintain integrity. There is a low likelihood of mineral trapping or scaling in the quartz rich lower Precipice Sandstone. Overlying rocks can provide Fe, Mg, Ca for mineral trapping of CO2 as ferroan carbonates such as siderite, ankerite and dolomite over longer time scales when pH is buffered. Changes to porosity, mineral content, and water chemistry after pure CO2 reaction observed here and in other published studies were dependent on mineral content and fluid accessibility. These results could be generalized to other sandstone reservoirs where it is expected to inject CO2. The results can also be used to validate geochemical models to build longer term predictions.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors wish to acknowledge financial assistance provided through the Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research and Development (ANLEC R&D).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier Ltd
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
dc.subjectSurat Basin
dc.subjectPrecipice sandstone
dc.subjectEvergreen formation
dc.subjectHutton sandstone
dc.subjectCO2 sequestration
dc.titleA combined geochemical and mu CT study on the CO2 reactivity of Surat Basin reservoir and cap-rock cores: Porosity changes, mineral dissolution and fines migration
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume80
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-15
dc.date.issued2018-11-25
local.identifier.absfor040201 - Exploration Geochemistry
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB2374
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPearce, J. K., University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationDawson, G. K. W., University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationGolab, A., FEI
local.contributor.affiliationKnuefing, Lydia, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSommacal, Silvano, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGolding, S. D., University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationRudolph, V., University of Queensland
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage10
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage24
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.11.010
local.identifier.absseo859899 - Environmentally Sustainable Energy Activities not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2019-08-25T08:17:52Z
local.identifier.thomsonID4.54008E+11
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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