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Responding to Negative Public Attitudes towards Immigration through Analysis and Policy: regional and unemployment dimensions

Golebiowska, Kate; Elnasri, Amani; Withers, Glenn

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This paper examines two key dimensions of the impact of immigration for Australia and related policy aspects. One is sub-national and the other is national. They are, first, the regional location aspects of immigration and, second, the aggregate unemployment implications of immigration. These are chosen so as to focus on two important issues that condition public attitudes towards immigration. In relation to the first, there is a common positive view that channelling migration towards regional...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGolebiowska, Kate
dc.contributor.authorElnasri, Amani
dc.contributor.authorWithers, Glenn
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-02T03:46:46Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-9182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/196463
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines two key dimensions of the impact of immigration for Australia and related policy aspects. One is sub-national and the other is national. They are, first, the regional location aspects of immigration and, second, the aggregate unemployment implications of immigration. These are chosen so as to focus on two important issues that condition public attitudes towards immigration. In relation to the first, there is a common positive view that channelling migration towards regional areas assists regional development and reduces pressure on metropolitan areas. The paper reviews regional concepts embodied in Australian immigration policy and the ways in which visa arrangements have implemented policies geared towards the regional dispersal of immigrants. Using official data, it discusses the demographic impacts of these policies and, in particular, considers the extent to which immigrants to regional Australia remain there over the longer term. In relation to unemployment, a common concern is that immigrants take jobs from local workers. The paper examines—using statistical regression methodology—the relationship between immigration and national aggregate unemployment in Australia. It evaluates the net consequences of immigration for both existing residents and new arrivals together. The paper concludes that, with good policy design in each case, regional location encouragement can be effective for immigrants and that immigrants need not take more jobs than they create. The analysis demonstrates that mixed-methods approaches to important social science issues can be productive, and helpful also for policy. Evidence, such as that presented in this paper, offers a powerful basis from which to counter negative public and political discourses surrounding immigration in contemporary Australia.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partly supported by the Australian Council of Learned Academies from the Australian Research Council Grant [LS120100001 “Securing Australia’s Future: Project 1 – Australia’s Comparative Advantage”].
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.rights© 2016 Geographical Society of New South Wales Inc.
dc.sourceAustralian Geographer
dc.titleResponding to Negative Public Attitudes towards Immigration through Analysis and Policy: regional and unemployment dimensions
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor140211 - Labour Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5427758xPUB244
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationGolebiowska, Kate, Charles Darwin University
local.contributor.affiliationElnasri, Amani, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationWithers, Glenn, College of Business and Economics, ANU
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LS120100001
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage435
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage453
local.identifier.doi10.1080/00049182.2016.1220904
dc.date.updated2019-08-04T08:21:59Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84984870554
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0004-9182/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). On institutional repository, subject-based repository or academic social network (Mendeley, ResearchGate or Academia.edu) after a 18 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 28/01/2020). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Australian Geographer on 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00049182.2016.1220904.
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