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How mountains shape biodiversity: The role of the Andes in biogeography, diversification, and reproductive biology in South America's most species-rich lizard radiation (Squamata: Liolaemidae)

Esquerre Gheur, Damien; Brennan, Ian; Catullo, Renee; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Keogh, J. Scott

Description

Testing hypotheses on drivers of clade evolution and trait diversification provides insight into many aspects of evolutionary biology. Often, studies investigate only intrinsic biological properties of organisms as the causes of diversity, however, extrinsic properties of a clade's environment, particularly geological history, may also offer compelling explanations. The Andes are a young mountain chain known to have shaped many aspects of climate and diversity of South America. The Liolaemidae...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEsquerre Gheur, Damien
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Ian
dc.contributor.authorCatullo, Renee
dc.contributor.authorTorres-Perez, Fernando
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, J. Scott
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-18T23:02:04Z
dc.identifier.issn0014-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/195972
dc.description.abstractTesting hypotheses on drivers of clade evolution and trait diversification provides insight into many aspects of evolutionary biology. Often, studies investigate only intrinsic biological properties of organisms as the causes of diversity, however, extrinsic properties of a clade's environment, particularly geological history, may also offer compelling explanations. The Andes are a young mountain chain known to have shaped many aspects of climate and diversity of South America. The Liolaemidae are a radiation of South American reptiles with over 300 species found across most biomes and with similar numbers of egg‐laying and live‐bearing species. Using the most complete dated phylogeny of the family, we tested the role of Andean uplift in biogeography, diversification patterns, and parity mode of the Liolaemidae. We find that the Andes promoted lineage diversification and acted as a species pump into surrounding biomes. We also find strong support for the role of Andean uplift in boosting the species diversity of these lizards via allopatric fragmentation. Finally, we find repeated shifts in parity mode associated with changing thermal niches, with live‐bearing favored in cold climates and egg‐laying favored in warm climates. Importantly, we find evidence for possible reversals to oviparity, an evolutionary transition believed to be extremely rare.
dc.description.sponsorshipD.E. is supported by a Becas Chile-CONICYT scholarship. F.T.P. is supported by a FONDECYT Chile grant (number 1140929). J.S.K. would like to thank the Australian Research Council for ongoing support.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Evolution
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s)
dc.sourceEvolution
dc.subjectAdaptive radiation
dc.subjectdiversification
dc.subjectLiolaemus
dc.subjectPhymaturus
dc.subjectviviparity
dc.titleHow mountains shape biodiversity: The role of the Andes in biogeography, diversification, and reproductive biology in South America's most species-rich lizard radiation (Squamata: Liolaemidae)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume73
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-19
dc.date.issued2018-12-11
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB2259
local.publisher.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEsquerre Gheur, Damien, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrennan, Ian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCatullo, Renee, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTorres-Perez, Fernando, Pontificia Universidad CatolicadeValparaıso
local.contributor.affiliationKeogh, J. Scott, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage214
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage230
local.identifier.doi10.1111/evo.13657
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2019-08-04T08:18:55Z
local.identifier.thomsonID4.58848E+11
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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