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Assessing the impact of conversational overlap in content on child language growth

Che, Elizabeth S.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Alarcon, Maria F.; Yannaco, Francis D.; Donnelly, Seamus

Description

When engaged in conversation, both parents and children tend to re-use words that their partner has just said. This study explored whether proportions of maternal and/or child utterances that overlapped in content with what their partner had just said contributed to growth in mean length of utterance (MLU), developmental sentence score, and vocabulary diversity over time. We analyzed the New England longitudinal corpus from the CHILDES database, comprising transcripts of mother–child...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChe, Elizabeth S.
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Patricia J.
dc.contributor.authorAlarcon, Maria F.
dc.contributor.authorYannaco, Francis D.
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Seamus
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-17T01:22:41Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-0009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/195635
dc.description.abstractWhen engaged in conversation, both parents and children tend to re-use words that their partner has just said. This study explored whether proportions of maternal and/or child utterances that overlapped in content with what their partner had just said contributed to growth in mean length of utterance (MLU), developmental sentence score, and vocabulary diversity over time. We analyzed the New England longitudinal corpus from the CHILDES database, comprising transcripts of mother–child conversations at 14, 20, and 32 months, using the CHIP command to compute proportions of utterances with overlapping content. Rates of maternal overlap, but not child overlap, at earlier time-points predicted child language outcomes at later time-points, after controlling for earlier child MLU. We suggest that maternal overlap plays a formative role in child language development by providing content that is immediately relevant to what the child has in mind.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.rights© 2017 Cambridge University Press
dc.sourceJournal of Child Language
dc.titleAssessing the impact of conversational overlap in content on child language growth
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume45
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-17
dc.date.issued2017-04-20
local.identifier.absfor170102 - Developmental Psychology and Ageing
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB2551
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChe, Elizabeth S., City University of New York
local.contributor.affiliationBrooks, Patricia J., City University of New York Graduate Center
local.contributor.affiliationAlarcon, Maria F., Long Island University
local.contributor.affiliationYannaco, Francis D., City University of New York
local.contributor.affiliationDonnelly, Seamus, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage72
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage96
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S0305000917000083
local.identifier.absseo920501 - Child Health
dc.date.updated2019-07-28T08:20:13Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85018495291
local.identifier.thomsonID000417473000003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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