Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Fact or fiction? A critique of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002

Chikritzhs, Tanya; Brady, Margaret

Description

The ability of policy makers, practitioners and the broader public to respond appropriately in reducing the harms caused by alcohol misuse depends in large part on our understanding of the nature of the problem. In the case of consumption patterns and associated harms among indigenous minority peoples - in Australia and elsewhere - such an understanding is often difficult to achieve. There are a host of reasons for this including cultural differences between indigenous peoples and the broader...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChikritzhs, Tanya
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:19:23Z
dc.identifier.issn0959-5236
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/19316
dc.description.abstractThe ability of policy makers, practitioners and the broader public to respond appropriately in reducing the harms caused by alcohol misuse depends in large part on our understanding of the nature of the problem. In the case of consumption patterns and associated harms among indigenous minority peoples - in Australia and elsewhere - such an understanding is often difficult to achieve. There are a host of reasons for this including cultural differences between indigenous peoples and the broader populations within which they are located, cultural heterogeneity among indigenous peoples themselves, political and economic disadvantages which exacerbate misuse and its effects, methodological difficulties in the appropriate design of data collection instruments, sampling issues and the issues in the interpretation of data. All these difficulties mean that we need to subject any studies of substance misuse among indigenous peoples to a high level of scrutiny. This is particularly the case when such studies are conducted by organisations that are generally regarded as 'authoritative sources of information. Chikritzhs & Brady have done this in the case of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002 , conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In their review of this and other surveys, they demonstrate that to produce valid information about indigenous alcohol misuse, as well as having the skills to conduct broad population surveys, it is necessary to have an understanding of both methods of collecting data on alcohol consumption and Indigenous cultures themselves.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceDrug and Alcohol Review
dc.subjectKeywords: Aborigine; alcoholism; article; Australia; comparative study; cultural factor; epidemiology; ethnology; harm reduction; health survey; human; information processing; management; politics; reproducibility; socioeconomics; statistics; Alcoholism; Australia;
dc.titleFact or fiction? A critique of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume25
dc.date.issued2006
local.identifier.absfor140302 - Econometric and Statistical Methods
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.absfor111715 - Pacific Peoples Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8100238xPUB7
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChikritzhs, Tanya, Curtin University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationBrady, Margaret , College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage277
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage287
local.identifier.doi10.1080/09595230600644715
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T08:34:45Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33744947044
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Chikritzhs_Fact_or_fiction?_A_critique_of_2006.pdf403.78 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator