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The usefulness of web spam

Jones, Timothy; Thomas, Paul; Sankaranarayana, Ramesh S; Hawking, David

Description

Spam comprises at least 60% of the public web, and search engine companies invest considerable effort in rejecting these apparently useless pages. But how bad are spam pages in search results? Can spam be dealt with as a side-effect of dealing with page utility, or is the relationship more complex? Thirty-four volunteer judges rated selected individual documents first on usefulness to a specified task and then on degree of "spamminess". Our results show that the relationship between spamminess...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJones, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Paul
dc.contributor.authorSankaranarayana, Ramesh S
dc.contributor.authorHawking, David
dc.contributor.editorSally Jo Cunningham
dc.contributor.editorFalk Scholer
dc.contributor.editorPaul Thomas
dc.coverage.spatialCanberra Australia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:18:41Z
dc.date.createdDecember 2 2011
dc.identifier.isbn9781921426926
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/18934
dc.description.abstractSpam comprises at least 60% of the public web, and search engine companies invest considerable effort in rejecting these apparently useless pages. But how bad are spam pages in search results? Can spam be dealt with as a side-effect of dealing with page utility, or is the relationship more complex? Thirty-four volunteer judges rated selected individual documents first on usefulness to a specified task and then on degree of "spamminess". Our results show that the relationship between spamminess and utility is far from clear cut; judges found that an important proportion of spam documents were useful. We conclude that evaluation should consider both utility and spamminess, as separate factors; and that search engines should not summarily discard spam pages but should take their utility into account as well.
dc.publisherRMIT University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAustralasian Document Computing Symposium (ADCS 2011)
dc.sourceProceedings of the Sixteenth Australasian Document Computing Symposium
dc.source.urihttp://www.cs.rmit.edu.au/adcs2011/
dc.subjectKeywords: CAN-SPAM; Engine companies; Search results; Side effect; User study; Web document; Search engines; World Wide Web User Studies Involving Documents; Web Documents
dc.titleThe usefulness of web spam
dc.typeConference paper
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor080704 - Information Retrieval and Web Search
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4313336xPUB6
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJones, Timothy, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationThomas, Paul, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSankaranarayana, Ramesh S, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHawking, David, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage5
local.identifier.absseo890301 - Electronic Information Storage and Retrieval Services
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:54:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84872841127
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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