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Distinguishing the pollen of Dipterocarpaceae from the seasonally dry, and moist tropics of south-east Asia using light microscopy

Hamilton, Rebecca; Hall, Tegan; Stevenson, Janelle; Penny, Dan

Description

The Dipterocarpaceae family is ubiquitous across mainland and maritime south-east Asia. Species within the family are often so well-adapted to – and prolific within – ecologically distinct forest types, that they are used as habitat indicators within forestry and ecological research. The limited work on the classification of Dipterocarpaceae pollen under light microscopy, however, means that paleoecologists working in the region are currently unable to link fossil pollen to indicator...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorHall, Tegan
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Janelle
dc.contributor.authorPenny, Dan
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-04T03:27:29Z
dc.identifier.issn0034-6667
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/187283
dc.description.abstractThe Dipterocarpaceae family is ubiquitous across mainland and maritime south-east Asia. Species within the family are often so well-adapted to – and prolific within – ecologically distinct forest types, that they are used as habitat indicators within forestry and ecological research. The limited work on the classification of Dipterocarpaceae pollen under light microscopy, however, means that paleoecologists working in the region are currently unable to link fossil pollen to indicator species/assemblages with any confidence. As a consequence, ecologically meaningful and habitat-specific data are homogenized in the paleorecord.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Australian Research Council (grant # DP160102587).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2019 Elsevier B.V
dc.sourceReview of Palaeobotany and Palynology
dc.titleDistinguishing the pollen of Dipterocarpaceae from the seasonally dry, and moist tropics of south-east Asia using light microscopy
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume263
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor060206 - Palaeoecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5786633xPUB648
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHamilton, Rebecca, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHall, Tegan, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationStevenson, Janelle, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPenny, Dan, University of Sydney
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP160102587
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage117
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage133
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.revpalbo.2019.01.012
local.identifier.absseo960305 - Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change
dc.date.updated2019-06-30T08:25:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85061002495
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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