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Revolutionary State Formation and the Unitary Republic of Indonesia

Reid, Anthony

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Recent trends in Europe whereby established states have surrendered some powers toward a supranational Europe, on the one hand, and sub-national regions on the other, make it possible to speak of a relaxation of the �sovereign equality� model that dominated the post-war world in which nation-states were presumed to be the sole and equal possessors of sovereignty. We should, however, be very careful about generalizing this globally. In particular, the new states of Asia have been in an intense...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorReid, Anthony
dc.contributor.editorJacques Bertrand
dc.contributor.editorAndré Laliberté
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:17:37Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780521194341
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/18657
dc.description.abstractRecent trends in Europe whereby established states have surrendered some powers toward a supranational Europe, on the one hand, and sub-national regions on the other, make it possible to speak of a relaxation of the �sovereign equality� model that dominated the post-war world in which nation-states were presumed to be the sole and equal possessors of sovereignty. We should, however, be very careful about generalizing this globally. In particular, the new states of Asia have been in an intense period of nation-building since 1945. The type of nationalism which T�nnesson and Antlov (1996) label �official,� I prefer to call �state nationalism� to avoid Anderson's (1991) negative use of the term, since it is the universal currency of states in seeking to create loyalty and homogeneity (Reid 2009). This type is still extremely vigorous in Asia, where the task of turning �peasants into Chinese� (or Indians, Indonesians, etc.) is by no means complete. The acceptance by China in 1997 and Indonesia in 2005 of a certain degree of asymmetry in the position of Hong Kong and Aceh, respectively, may look like pragmatic retreats from the nationalist project, but there is still profound resistance in both these states toward recognizing the validity of self-governing �nations� within established states. It would be wrong to see this difference, however, as a consequence of either Asian cultural norms or long-term patterns of Asian statecraft.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.ispartofMultination States in Asia: accommodation or resistance
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rightsThe chapter can only be viewed or downloaded for personal research only. Publisher email permission to archive the published version of book chapter 20/6/2018
dc.source.urihttp://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/politics-international-relations/east-asian-government-politics-and-policy/multination-states-asia-accommodation-or-resistance?format=PB&isbn=9780521143639#16OYuwBmxGJT3Rlh.97
dc.titleRevolutionary State Formation and the Unitary Republic of Indonesia
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.notesDocument Id: ERMS2322508
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor160606 - Government and Politics of Asia and the Pacific
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4265029xPUB5
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationReid, Anthony , College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage29
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage50
local.identifier.doi10.1017/CBO9780511750755.003
dc.date.updated2020-12-13T07:24:47Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew York
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84924081374
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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