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High burden of infectious disease and antibiotic use in early life in Australian Aboriginal communities

Cunningham, Will; McVernon, Jodie; Lydeamore, M.J.; Andrews, Ross; Carapetis, Jonathan; Kearns, Therese; Clucas, D.; Dhurrkay, R. Gundjirryirr; Tong, Steven Y C; Campbell, Patricia

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Objective: To quantify the childhood infectious disease burden and antibiotic use in the Northern Territory’s East Arnhem region through synthesis and analysis of historical data resources. Methods: We combined primary health clinic data originally reported in three separate publications stemming from the East Arnhem Healthy Skin Project (Jan‐01 to Sep‐07). Common statistical techniques were used to explore the prevalence of infectious conditions and the seasonality of infections, and to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Will
dc.contributor.authorMcVernon, Jodie
dc.contributor.authorLydeamore, M.J.
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Ross
dc.contributor.authorCarapetis, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorKearns, Therese
dc.contributor.authorClucas, D.
dc.contributor.authorDhurrkay, R. Gundjirryirr
dc.contributor.authorTong, Steven Y C
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-25T03:15:43Z
dc.date.available2019-11-25T03:15:43Z
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/186578
dc.description.abstractObjective: To quantify the childhood infectious disease burden and antibiotic use in the Northern Territory’s East Arnhem region through synthesis and analysis of historical data resources. Methods: We combined primary health clinic data originally reported in three separate publications stemming from the East Arnhem Healthy Skin Project (Jan‐01 to Sep‐07). Common statistical techniques were used to explore the prevalence of infectious conditions and the seasonality of infections, and to measure rates of antibiotic use. Results: There was a high monthly prevalence of respiratory (mean: 32% [95% confidence interval (CI): 20%, 34%]) and skin (mean: 20% [95%CI: 19%, 22%]) infectious syndromes, with upper respiratory tract infections (mean: 29% [95%CI: 27%, 31%]) and skin sores (mean: 15% [95%CI: 14%, 17%]) the most common conditions. Antibiotics were frequently prescribed with 95% (95%CI: 91%, 97%) of children having received at least one antibiotic prescription by their first birthday, and 47% having received six antibiotic prescriptions; skin sores being a key driver. Conclusions: Early life infections drive high antibiotic prescribing rates in remote Aboriginal communities. Implications for public health: Eliminating skin disease could reduce antibiotic use by almost 20% in children under five years of age in this population.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPublic Health Association of Australia
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
dc.titleHigh burden of infectious disease and antibiotic use in early life in Australian Aboriginal communities
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume43
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor111701 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB985
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.wiley.com/en-gb
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, Will, Charles Darwin University
local.contributor.affiliationMcVernon, Jodie, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationLydeamore, M.J., School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationAndrews, Ross, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCarapetis, Jonathan, Telethon Kids Institute
local.contributor.affiliationKearns, Therese, Charles Darwin University
local.contributor.affiliationClucas, D., Clinical Haematology, The Alfred Hospital and Monash Medical Centre,
local.contributor.affiliationDhurrkay, R. Gundjirryirr, Menzies School of Health Research
local.contributor.affiliationTong, Steven Y C, Charles Darwin University
local.contributor.affiliationCampbell, Patricia, University of Melbourne
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1098319
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1117140
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1145033
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage149
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage155
local.identifier.doi10.1111/1753-6405.12876
local.identifier.absseo920303 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions)
dc.date.updated2019-05-19T08:21:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85061313873
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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