Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Quantifying movement demands of AFL football using GPS tracking

Wisbey, Ben; Montgomery, Paul; Pyne, David; Rattray, Ben

Description

Global positioning system (GPS) monitoring of movement patterns is widespread in elite football including the Australian Football League (AFL). However documented analysis of this activity is lacking. We quantified the movement patterns of AFL football and differences between nomadic (midfield), forward and defender playing positions, and determined whether the physical demands have increased over a four season period. Selected premiership games were monitored during the 2005 (n=80 game files),...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWisbey, Ben
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Paul
dc.contributor.authorPyne, David
dc.contributor.authorRattray, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:17:35Z
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/18645
dc.description.abstractGlobal positioning system (GPS) monitoring of movement patterns is widespread in elite football including the Australian Football League (AFL). However documented analysis of this activity is lacking. We quantified the movement patterns of AFL football and differences between nomadic (midfield), forward and defender playing positions, and determined whether the physical demands have increased over a four season period. Selected premiership games were monitored during the 2005 (n=80 game files), 2006 (n=244), 2007 (n=632) and 2008 (n=793) AFL seasons. Players were fitted with a shoulder harness containing a GPS unit. GPS data were downloaded after games and the following measures extracted: total distance (km), time in various speed zones, maximum speed, number of surges, accelerations, longest continuous efforts and a derived exertion index representing playing intensity. In 2008 nomadic players covered per game 3.4% more total distance (km), had 4.8% less playing time (min), a 17% higher exertion index (per min), and 23% more time running >18kmh-1 than forwards and defenders (all p<0.05). Physical demands were substantially higher in the 2008 season compared with 2005: an 8.4% increase in mean speed, a 14% increase in intensity (exertion index) and a 9.0% decrease in playing time (all p<0.05). Nomadic players in AFL work substantially harder than forwards and defenders in covering more ground and at higher running intensities. Increases in the physical demands of AFL football were evident between 2005 and 2008. The increasing speed of the game has implications for game authorities, players and coaching staff.
dc.publisherSports Medicine Australia
dc.sourceJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
dc.subjectKeywords: acceleration; article; Australia; fitness; football; global positioning system; human; human experiment; motion analysis system; movement (physiology); running; velocity; Athletic Performance; Geographic Information Systems; Humans; Male; Physical Fitness Australian football; Exertion index; Fitness; Global positioning system; Movement patterns
dc.titleQuantifying movement demands of AFL football using GPS tracking
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor110699 - Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4201517xPUB5
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWisbey, Ben, Fitsense Australia
local.contributor.affiliationMontgomery, Paul, Fitsense Australia
local.contributor.affiliationPyne, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRattray, Ben, Fitsense Australia
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage531
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage536
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2009.09.002
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:42:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77955655339
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Wisbey_Quantifying_movement_demands_2010.pdf153.05 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator