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Bariatric surgery for women of reproductive age

Robson, Stephen; Daniels, B.; Rawlings, Louise

Description

Australia is ranked fifth of all OECD countries for prevalence of obesity in women,1 and the proportion of young women with obesity is increasing. Over the last decade the estimated prevalence has increased by about 60% in Australian women aged 25–34 years, and by a remarkable 80% in women aged 35–44 years.2 In 2012 just over 20% of women giving birth in Australia had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or greater, and 3% had a BMI of 40 kg/m2 or more. As the theme of this issue of BJOG...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRobson, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, B.
dc.contributor.authorRawlings, Louise
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-19T01:26:49Z
dc.identifier.citationRobson S, Daniels B, Rawlings L. Bariatric surgery for women of reproductive age. BJOG 2016;123:171–174.
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/186358
dc.description.abstractAustralia is ranked fifth of all OECD countries for prevalence of obesity in women,1 and the proportion of young women with obesity is increasing. Over the last decade the estimated prevalence has increased by about 60% in Australian women aged 25–34 years, and by a remarkable 80% in women aged 35–44 years.2 In 2012 just over 20% of women giving birth in Australia had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or greater, and 3% had a BMI of 40 kg/m2 or more. As the theme of this issue of BJOG attests, obesity has become perhaps the major challenge facing those who provide care to women who are pregnant or seeking to become pregnant in both the developed and, increasingly, the developing world. Obesity is important because it affects all phases of a woman’s reproductive life —it makes achieving an ongoing pregnancy more difficult, increases the likelihood of things going wrong during pregnancy and birth, can have important long-term adverse effects for the offspring, and limits the ability of a woman to provide longer-term parental care to her children. For all of these reasons, finding ways to help reproductive-age women return to a healthy weight before they try to become pregnant should be a priority.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
dc.sourceBJOG - an international journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
dc.subjectAffiliation for L Rawlings is listed on the article.
dc.titleBariatric surgery for women of reproductive age
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume123
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-09-07
dc.date.issued2015-11-05
local.identifier.absfor111402 - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB17122
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRobson, Stephen, Medical School, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDaniels, B, Royal Hobart Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationRawlings, Louise, Regulatory Institutions Network (RegNet), ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.identifier.doi10.1111/1471-0528.13715
dc.date.updated2019-05-12T08:18:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84952864224
local.identifier.thomsonID000367474700005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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