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Estimating vaccine effects on Transmission of Infection from Household Data

Becker, Niels; Britton, Tom; O'Neill, Philip D

Description

This article is concerned with a method for making inferences about various measures of vaccine efficacy. These measures describe reductions in susceptibility and in the potential to transmit infection. The method uses data on household outbreaks; it is based on a model that allows for transmission of infection both from within a household and from the outside. The use of household data is motivated by the hope that these are informative about vaccine-induced reduction of the potential to...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBecker, Niels
dc.contributor.authorBritton, Tom
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Philip D
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:15:23Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-341X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/17897
dc.description.abstractThis article is concerned with a method for making inferences about various measures of vaccine efficacy. These measures describe reductions in susceptibility and in the potential to transmit infection. The method uses data on household outbreaks; it is based on a model that allows for transmission of infection both from within a household and from the outside. The use of household data is motivated by the hope that these are informative about vaccine-induced reduction of the potential to transmit infection, as household outbreaks contain some information about the possible source of infection. For illustration, the method is applied to observed data on household outbreaks of smallpox. These data are of the form needed and the number of households is of a size that can be managed in a vaccine trial. It is found that vaccine effects, such as the mean reduction in susceptibility and the mean reduction in the potential to infect others, per infectious contact, can be estimated with precision. However, a more specific parameter reflecting the reduction in infectivity for individuals partially responding to vaccination is not estimated well in the application. An evaluation of the method using artificial data shows that this parameter can be estimated with greater precision when we have outbreak data on a large number of small households.
dc.publisherInternational Biometrics Society
dc.sourceBiometrics
dc.subjectKeywords: smallpox vaccine; vaccine; disease control; disease transmission; efficiency measurement; vaccination; article; clinical trial; contact examination; data analysis; disease predisposition; disease transmission; drug efficacy; household; human; infection; s Design of vaccine trials; Household outbreaks; Infectivity; Smallpox; Susceptibility to infection; Transmission of infection; Vaccine efficacy
dc.titleEstimating vaccine effects on Transmission of Infection from Household Data
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume59
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9707783xPUB2
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBecker, Niels, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBritton, Tom, Stockholm University
local.contributor.affiliationO'Neill, Philip D, University of Nottingham
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage467
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage475
local.identifier.doi10.1111/1541-0420.00056
local.identifier.absseo920404 - Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T07:45:12Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0042835660
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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