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How eating disordered and non-eating disordered women differ in their use (and effectiveness) of cognitive self-regulation strategies for managing negative experiences

Crino, Natalie; Touyz, Stephen W; Rieger, Elizabeth

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Purpose: The present study compared the use (and effectiveness) of cognitive self-regulation strategies in eating disordered (ED) and non-eating disordered women (non-ED), and whether ED subgroups differ in their use of avoidant/suppressive strategies and cognitive reappraisal. Methods: The participants consisted of 90 adult patients recruited from a specialist eating disorder service and 97 adults without an ED. Cognitive self-regulation strategies were examined on a baseline self-report...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCrino, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorTouyz, Stephen W
dc.contributor.authorRieger, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T02:19:43Z
dc.identifier.issn1124-4909
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/176965
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The present study compared the use (and effectiveness) of cognitive self-regulation strategies in eating disordered (ED) and non-eating disordered women (non-ED), and whether ED subgroups differ in their use of avoidant/suppressive strategies and cognitive reappraisal. Methods: The participants consisted of 90 adult patients recruited from a specialist eating disorder service and 97 adults without an ED. Cognitive self-regulation strategies were examined on a baseline self-report measure and while looking in a mirror. Results: The results of this study showed that, relative to the non-ED group, ED participants engage in more worry and self-punishment and less distraction and social control strategies in general but not specifically during a body exposure task. Reappraisal strategies were equally likely to be used by clinical and non-clinical groups but participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) found them less effective during the task. Non-ED participants found distraction strategies more effective than the ED group for managing the body exposure experience. ED subgroups used avoidant/suppressive strategies and cognitive reappraisal strategies to a similar extent. Conclusion: The use of maladaptive self-regulation strategies, and the use and effectiveness of some of the more adaptive self-regulation strategies sets eating disorders apart from those without an eating disorder, supporting previous research in the area. Contrary to what was predicted, the results were similar across ED subgroups. The findings highlight the importance of cognitive self-regulation strategies as a focus of research and clinical intervention. Level of evidence: Level III: Case-control study.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.rights© Springer International Publishing AG 2017
dc.sourceEating and Weight Disorders
dc.titleHow eating disordered and non-eating disordered women differ in their use (and effectiveness) of cognitive self-regulation strategies for managing negative experiences
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume24
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor170299 - Cognitive Science not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB8930
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCrino, Natalie, Westmead Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationTouyz, Stephen W, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationRieger, Elizabeth, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s40519-017-0448-z
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2019-11-25T07:22:35Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85034634409
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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