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Ellora. Cave 9 (Buddhist). Façade. 350-550 A.D.

This item is provided for research purposes. Contact the Australian National University Archives at butlin.archives@anu.edu.au for permission to use.

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dc.contributor.authorPhotographer: Arthur Llewellyn Basham
dc.coverage.spatialIndia (Ellora Caves, Maharashtra)
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-15T01:04:59Z
dc.date.available2019-10-15T01:04:59Z
dc.date.createdcirca 1970s
dc.identifierANUA 682-1377
dc.identifier.otherIM-457
dc.identifier.other13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/176372
dc.descriptionOf the few Buddhist structures at Ellora, most are beautifully handled in terms of their decorational syste77ms and attain a very high level of complexity without being grossly elaborate as perhaps the Brahmanical tend to be with their generously applied sculptures. We might characterize the facade of cave 9, for example, by the words 'simple elegance,' for the decoration is consistent in its motifs and their roles in proportion to the system as a whole, while the carving itself is delicately handled as if the surface were ivory rather than brittle stone. The columns supporting the gallery of the facade are sturdy prismatic structures decorated with panels of reliefs at the top only. Across the beam of the entrance is a frieze divided along its length by panels containing figures of Buddha and his attendants. Above this, in several staggered layers, are small chaitya-window motifs (not unlike those at Ajanta, cave 9, in function) each housing a figure of Buddha, or Buddha and his two main attendants, the Bodhisattvas Padmapani and Maitreya. The use of the Buddha image heralds the coming to prominence of Mahayana (Greater Vehicle) Buddhism over the Hinayana (Lesser Vehicle) concepts. In style, the sculptures are within the Classic Gupta Period during its early phase as it was manifested in the Sarnath school of sculpture
dc.descriptionthat is, finely carved and finished with precision. It seems closer to Sarnath than to Mathura of the same period, for the latter is entirely more robust in terms of treatment than either Ellora or Sarnath.
dc.format.extent35mm
dc.format.mediummounted transparency
dc.format.mediumb&w
dc.format.mediumsepia
dc.format.mimetypeimage/tiff
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBasham Collection
dc.subjectDeccan-- Western Cave Temples-- Ellora
dc.subjectarchitecture
dc.subjectstone sculpture
dc.subjectslide set
dc.titleEllora. Cave 9 (Buddhist). Façade. 350-550 A.D.
dc.typeImage
dc.date.updated2019-10-15T01:04:59Z
dc.provenanceDigitised by the Australian National University in 2019
dc.rights.licenseThis item is provided for research purposes. Contact the Australian National University Archives at butlin.archives@anu.edu.au for permission to use.
CollectionsArthur Llewellyn Basham

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