Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Rapid Parallel Evolution of Azole Fungicide Resistance in Australian Populations of the Wheat Pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

McDonald, Megan; Renkin, Melanie; Spackman, Merrin; Orchard, B. A.; Croll, Daniel; Solomon, Peter; Milgate, Andrew

Description

Zymoseptoria tritici is a globally distributed fungal pathogen which causes Septoria tritici blotch on wheat. Management of the disease is attempted through the deployment of resistant wheat cultivars and the application of fungicides. However, fungicide resistance is commonly observed in Z. tritici populations, and continuous monitoring is required to detect breakdowns in fungicide efficacy. We recently reported azole-resistant isolates in Australia; however, it remained unknown whether...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Megan
dc.contributor.authorRenkin, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorSpackman, Merrin
dc.contributor.authorOrchard, B. A.
dc.contributor.authorCroll, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMilgate, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T23:48:38Z
dc.identifier.citationMcDonald MC, Renkin M, Spackman M, Orchard B, Croll D, Solomon PS, Milgate A. 2019. Rapid parallel evolution of azole fungicide resistance in Australian populations of the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. Appl Environ Microbiol 85:e01908-18. https:// doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01908-18.
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/173285
dc.description.abstractZymoseptoria tritici is a globally distributed fungal pathogen which causes Septoria tritici blotch on wheat. Management of the disease is attempted through the deployment of resistant wheat cultivars and the application of fungicides. However, fungicide resistance is commonly observed in Z. tritici populations, and continuous monitoring is required to detect breakdowns in fungicide efficacy. We recently reported azole-resistant isolates in Australia; however, it remained unknown whether resistance was brought into the continent through gene flow or whether resistance emerged independently. To address this question, we screened 43 isolates across five Australian locations for azole sensitivity and performed whole-genome sequencing on 58 isolates from seven locations to determine the genetic basis of resistance. Population genomic analyses showed extremely strong differentiation between the Australian population recovered after azoles began to be used and both Australian populations recovered before azoles began to be used and populations on different continents. The apparent absence of recent gene flow between Australia and other continents suggests that azole fungicide resistance has evolved de novo and subsequently spread within Tasmania. Despite the isolates being distinct at the whole-genome level, we observed combinations of nonsynonymous substitutions at the CYP51 locus identical to those observed elsewhere in the world. We observed nine previously reported nonsynonymous mutations as well as isolates that carried a combination of the previously reported L50S, S188N, A379G, I381V, Y459DEL, G460DEL, and N513K substitutions. Assays for the 50% effective concentration against a subset of isolates exposed to the tebuconazole and epoxiconazole fungicides showed high levels of azole resistance. The rapid, parallel evolution of a complex CYP51 haplotype that matches a dominant European haplotype demonstrates the enormous potential for de novo resistance emergence in pathogenic fungi.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded as a coinvestment by the Grains and Research Development Corporation and the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DAN00177). M.C.M. is supported by the Australian National University, Grains and Research Development Corporation, and NSW Department of Primary Industries coinvestment DAN00203 as part of the Grains, Agronomy and Pathology Partnership. D.C. is supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant 31003A_173265).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology
dc.rights© 2019 American Society for Microbiology
dc.sourceApplied and Environmental Microbiology
dc.subjectazole
dc.subjectCYP51
dc.subjectZymoseptoria tritici
dc.subjectfungicide resistance
dc.titleRapid Parallel Evolution of Azole Fungicide Resistance in Australian Populations of the Wheat Pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume85
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-30
dc.date.issued2019-02-06
local.identifier.absfor070308 - Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
local.identifier.absfor060704 - Plant Pathology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB730
local.publisher.urlhttps://aem.asm.org
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcDonald, Megan, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRenkin, Melanie, NSW Department of Primary Industries
local.contributor.affiliationSpackman, Merrin, NSW Department of Primary Industries
local.contributor.affiliationOrchard, B. A., NSW Department of Primary Industries
local.contributor.affiliationCroll, Daniel, University of Neuchatel
local.contributor.affiliationSolomon, Peter, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMilgate, Andrew, NSW Department of Primary Industries
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage14
local.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.01908-18
local.identifier.absseo820507 - Wheat
dc.date.updated2019-04-21T08:26:45Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85061114625
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_McDonald_Rapid_Parallel_Evolution_of_2019.pdf1.06 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator