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Cartooning the camp: Aesthetic interruption and the limits of political possibility

Wedderburn, Alister

Description

Over the last 30 years, post-structuralist, feminist and other IR theorists have asked questions of the ways in which discourses on sovereignty seek to foreclose political possibility. To do so, they have advanced a decentralised, contested, incomplete and relational understanding of politics that presupposes some sort of intersubjective agency, however fragmented. There is one site, however, that appears to confound this line of argument insofar as it is commonly understood to exemplify an...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWedderburn, Alister
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T05:16:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0305-8298
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/173102
dc.description.abstractOver the last 30 years, post-structuralist, feminist and other IR theorists have asked questions of the ways in which discourses on sovereignty seek to foreclose political possibility. To do so, they have advanced a decentralised, contested, incomplete and relational understanding of politics that presupposes some sort of intersubjective agency, however fragmented. There is one site, however, that appears to confound this line of argument insofar as it is commonly understood to exemplify an entirely non-relational, anti-political ‘desolation’: the concentration camp. Drawing on feminist theory to establish the terms of an aesthetic mode of ‘interruption’, this article will identify a compelling challenge to this position in a comic book drawn by Horst Rosenthal, a German–Jewish detainee at Gurs in Vichy, France, who was later killed at Auschwitz–Birkenau. Rosenthal’s piece will be read as an ‘aesthetic interruption’ that mounts a powerful critique of the logic underpinning his concentrationary experience, and in so doing demonstrates one way in which (to however painfully limited a degree) the political might be ‘brought back in’ to discussions about sovereign power.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research has been made possible by an Economic and Social Research Council funding grant, ref. ES/J500057/1.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherLondon School of Economics
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018
dc.sourceMillennium: Journal of International Studies
dc.subjectaesthetics
dc.subjectpopular culture
dc.subjectvisual global politics
dc.subjectsovereignty
dc.subjectcomics
dc.titleCartooning the camp: Aesthetic interruption and the limits of political possibility
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2019
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB583
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWedderburn, Alister, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage169
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage189
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0305829818799884
local.identifier.absseo940399 - International Relations not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2019-04-21T08:26:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85059556870
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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