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The nerves and muscles of medusae. II. Geryonia proboscidalis Eschscholtz

Horridge, George Adrian

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Summary 1. The responses of Geryonia proboscidalis to electrical and mechanical stimulation have been studied with particular attention to the transmission of excitation. 2. There are two kinds of excitation transmitted across the undersurface of the bell; first, the symmetrical beat is co-ordinated by an isotropic conducting system which acts in a through-conducting, all-or-nothing manner, and produces brief contractions of the circular muscle; secondly, the movements of the manubrium are...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHorridge, George Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T04:29:56Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T04:29:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-0949
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/170644
dc.description.abstractSummary 1. The responses of Geryonia proboscidalis to electrical and mechanical stimulation have been studied with particular attention to the transmission of excitation. 2. There are two kinds of excitation transmitted across the undersurface of the bell; first, the symmetrical beat is co-ordinated by an isotropic conducting system which acts in a through-conducting, all-or-nothing manner, and produces brief contractions of the circular muscle; secondly, the movements of the manubrium are co-ordinated by a radial conducting system, which produces a maintained contraction of the radial muscles of the manubrium. 3. The independence of these two conducting systems is shown by the simultaneous and yet distinct transmission of the two kinds of excitation in different directions. 4. The contraction wave is not transmitted through the ring nerves faster than over the rest of the bell. 5. The manubrium bends towards a stimulated tentacle, and all the tentacles contract simultaneously, co-ordinated by a through-conducting pathway in the marginal nerve. There is evidence that a polarized pathway carries excitation from this system to the rhythmical marginal centres. 6. Observations of Geryonia held with the axis horizontal show that the steering action is due to an asymmetrical maintained contraction of the velum. 7. The known histological details of the nervous system are compared with the physiological pathways demonstrated by experiment. The differentiation of a primitive isotropic nerve net into distinct tracts with separate functions is essential for the several rapid feeding and swimming activities.
dc.format.extent14 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCompany of Biologists
dc.rights© 1955 The Company of Biologists Ltd
dc.sourceJournal of experimental Biology
dc.subjectGeryonia proboscidalis
dc.subjectstimulation
dc.subjectresponse
dc.subjectmuscle
dc.subjectnerve
dc.subjectmedusae
dc.subjectconducting system
dc.subjectisotropic
dc.subjectundersurface
dc.subjectbell
dc.subjectexcitation
dc.subjectsymmetrical beat
dc.subjectradial conducting system
dc.subjectmanubrium
dc.subjectnervous system
dc.titleThe nerves and muscles of medusae. II. Geryonia proboscidalis Eschscholtz
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesAt the time of publication the author was affiliated with the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, and Stazione Zoologica, Naples.
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued1955-09-01
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.biologists.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHorridge, George Adrian, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CoS Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1477-9145
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage555
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage568
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0022-0949/ Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. Publisher's version/PDF may be used (Sherpa/Romeo as of 23/9/2019)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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