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Leptospirosis: An important zoonosis acquired through work, play and travel

Lau, Colleen; Townell, Nicola; Stephenson, Eloise; Van den Berg, Debra; Craig, Scott

Description

Background Leptospirosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. Infection occurs through contact with infected animals, or soil or water that has been contaminated by the urine of infected animals. Risk factors include occupational and recreational exposures, contact with floodwaters, and travel to areas with a high risk of leptospirosis, particularly tropical, developing countries. With climate change, flood-related outbreaks are becoming more common. Objective This article...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLau, Colleen
dc.contributor.authorTownell, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Eloise
dc.contributor.authorVan den Berg, Debra
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T00:34:12Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T00:34:12Z
dc.identifier.issn2208-7958
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/170465
dc.description.abstractBackground Leptospirosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. Infection occurs through contact with infected animals, or soil or water that has been contaminated by the urine of infected animals. Risk factors include occupational and recreational exposures, contact with floodwaters, and travel to areas with a high risk of leptospirosis, particularly tropical, developing countries. With climate change, flood-related outbreaks are becoming more common. Objective This article aims to improve awareness of leptospirosis, and provide an update for general practitioners on its epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, management and prevention. Discussion Leptospirosis is sometimes misdiagnosed because clinical presentation can be non-specific and overlap with many other causes of acute febrile illnesses. In patients with risk factors for leptospirosis, a high index of clinical suspicion is important to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. Delays in treatment could increase the risk of severe complications, including pulmonary haemorrhage, acute renal failure and acute liver failure.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoyal Australian College of General Practitioners
dc.rights© The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners 2018
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of General Practice
dc.source.urihttps://www1.racgp.org.au/ajgp/2018/march/leptospirosis
dc.titleLeptospirosis: An important zoonosis acquired through work, play and travel
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5684624xPUB254
local.publisher.urlhttps://www1.racgp.org.au/ajgp/home
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationLau, Colleen, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTownell, Nicola, Mater Adults Hospital and University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationStephenson, Eloise, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationVan den Berg, Debra, Communicable Disease Surveillance, North Coast Public Health Unit,
local.contributor.affiliationCraig, Scott, Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage105
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage110
local.identifier.doi.31128/afp-07-17-4286
dc.date.updated2021-08-01T08:41:18Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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