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Investigation of the Climatic and Environmental Context of Hendra Virus Spillover Events 1994–2010

McFarlane, Rosemary; Becker, Niels; Field, Hume

Description

Hendra virus is a recently emerged bat-borne zoonotic agent with high lethality in horses and humans in Australia. This is a rare disease and the determinants of bat to horse transmission, including the factors that bring these hosts together at critical times, are poorly understood. In this cross-disciplinary study climatic and vegetation primary productivity variables are compared for the dispersed and heterogenic 1994-2010 outbreak sites. The significant occurrence of spillover events within...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Niels
dc.contributor.authorField, Hume
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-26T00:55:54Z
dc.date.available2015-11-26T00:55:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/16823
dc.description.abstractHendra virus is a recently emerged bat-borne zoonotic agent with high lethality in horses and humans in Australia. This is a rare disease and the determinants of bat to horse transmission, including the factors that bring these hosts together at critical times, are poorly understood. In this cross-disciplinary study climatic and vegetation primary productivity variables are compared for the dispersed and heterogenic 1994-2010 outbreak sites. The significant occurrence of spillover events within the dry season (p =  0.013, 95% CI (0.57-0.98)) suggests seasonal forcing of transmission across species, or seasonal forcing of virus excretion by the reservoir host. We explore the evidence for both. Preliminary investigations of the spatial determinants of Hendra disease locations are also presented. We find that postal areas in the Australian state of Queensland in which pteropid fruit bat (flying fox) roosts occur are approximately forty times more likely (OR = 40.5, (95% CI (5.16, 317.52)) to be the location of Hendra spillover events. This appears to be independent of density of horses at these locations. We consider issues of scale of host resource use, land use change and limitations of existing data that challenge analysis and limit further conclusive outcomes. This investigation of a broad range of potential climatic and environmental influences provides a good base for future investigations. Further understanding of cross-species Hendra virus transmission requires better understanding of flying fox resource use in the urban-rural landscape.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the Australian Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases (http://www.abcrc.org.au). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2011 McFarlane et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.sourcePLoS ONE
dc.source.urihttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0028374
dc.subjectanimals
dc.subjectaustralia
dc.subjectchiroptera
dc.subjecthendra virus
dc.subjecthenipavirus infections
dc.subjecttime factors
dc.subjectclimate
dc.subjectdisease outbreaks
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.titleInvestigation of the Climatic and Environmental Context of Hendra Virus Spillover Events 1994–2010
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2011-12-01
local.identifier.absfor111706
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB259
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcFarlane, Rosemary, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Population Health, Natl Centre for Epidemiology & Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationBecker, Niels, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Population Health, Natl Centre for Epidemiology & Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationField, Hume, QLD Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Australia
local.identifier.essn1932-6203
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee28374
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0028374
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T09:10:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-82455167216
local.identifier.thomsonID000298168900022
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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