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Pigment movement and the crystalline threads of the firefly eye

Horridge, George Adrian

Description

The compound eye of the firefly is the one outstanding example which shows evidence of an image which is formed by the combination of rays that have entered by several facets. The original account by Exner1 includes a description and photograph of the erect image that can be found behind the cleaned cornea of the firefly Lampyris. This image has been confirmed by others2 and a theoretical explanation of it supposes that an inverted first image is formed within each corneal cone by the curvature...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHorridge, George Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-12T01:33:40Z
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/167220
dc.description.abstractThe compound eye of the firefly is the one outstanding example which shows evidence of an image which is formed by the combination of rays that have entered by several facets. The original account by Exner1 includes a description and photograph of the erect image that can be found behind the cleaned cornea of the firefly Lampyris. This image has been confirmed by others2 and a theoretical explanation of it supposes that an inverted first image is formed within each corneal cone by the curvature of its front surface and that an erect second image is then formed by the curved surface of the proximal tip of the corneal cone3. The erect superposition image, however (which undoubtedly exists if the cornea is well cleaned), does not lie in the place of the receptors4 and there is no evidence that it has a functional significance. In fact, the superposition theory depends on the unlikely existence of an optically homogeneous and transparent region between the cornea and the layer of receptors. Despite its importance to the theory, the anatomy of the firefly retina remains unknown. The following account, based on Photuris versicolor, points to the conclusion that the superposition theory is applicable only to a cleaned cornea because the actual anatomy suggests quite a different optical system.
dc.description.sponsorshipAt the time of publication the author was affiliated with the Gatty Marine Laboratory and Department of Natural History, University of St Andrews.
dc.format.extent2 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature)
dc.rights© 1968 Nature Publishing Group
dc.sourceNature
dc.subjectfirefly
dc.subjectcompound eye
dc.subjectmovement
dc.subjectLampyris
dc.subjectPhoturis versicolor
dc.subjectcornea
dc.subjectretina
dc.titlePigment movement and the crystalline threads of the firefly eye
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume218
dc.date.issued1968-05-25
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.nature.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHorridge, George Adrian, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CoS Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.essn1476-4687
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage778
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage779
local.identifier.doi10.1038/218778a0
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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