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Viral Infection Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Homing Ability of Forager Honey Bees, Apis mellifera L

Li, Zhiguo; Chen, Yanping; Zhang, Shaowu; Chen, Shenglu; Li, Wenfeng; Yan, Limin; Shi, Liangen; Wu, Lyman; Sohr, Alex; Su, Songkun

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Honey bee health is mainly affected by Varroa destructor, viruses, Nosema spp., pesticide residues and poor nutrition. Interactions between these proposed factors may be responsible for the colony losses reported worldwide in recent years. In the present study, the effects of a honey bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), on the foraging behaviors and homing ability of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were investigated based on proboscis extension response (PER) assays and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhiguo
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yanping
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Shaowu
dc.contributor.authorChen, Shenglu
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wenfeng
dc.contributor.authorYan, Limin
dc.contributor.authorShi, Liangen
dc.contributor.authorWu, Lyman
dc.contributor.authorSohr, Alex
dc.contributor.authorSu, Songkun
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T04:34:15Z
dc.date.available2015-11-24T04:34:15Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/16648
dc.description.abstractHoney bee health is mainly affected by Varroa destructor, viruses, Nosema spp., pesticide residues and poor nutrition. Interactions between these proposed factors may be responsible for the colony losses reported worldwide in recent years. In the present study, the effects of a honey bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), on the foraging behaviors and homing ability of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were investigated based on proboscis extension response (PER) assays and radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. The pollen forager honey bees originated from colonies that had no detectable level of honey bee viruses and were manually inoculated with IAPV to induce the viral infection. The results showed that IAPV-inoculated honey bees were more responsive to low sucrose solutions compared to that of non-infected foragers. After two days of infection, around 10⁷ copies of IAPV were detected in the heads of these honey bees. The homing ability of IAPV-infected foragers was depressed significantly in comparison to the homing ability of uninfected foragers. The data provided evidence that IAPV infection in the heads may enable the virus to disorder foraging roles of honey bees and to interfere with brain functions that are responsible for learning, navigation, and orientation in the honey bees, thus, making honey bees have a lower response threshold to sucrose and lose their way back to the hive.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by earmarked funds for Modern Agro-industry Technology Research System (No. CARS-45-KXJ3), Nature and Science Foundation Commission of Zhejiang Province (R3080306) to SKS. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2013 Li et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.sourcePLoS ONE
dc.subjectanimals
dc.subjectbees
dc.subjectdicistroviridae
dc.subjectfeeding behavior
dc.subjecthoming behavior
dc.subjectsucrose
dc.subjectvirus diseases
dc.subjecthost-pathogen interactions
dc.titleViral Infection Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Homing Ability of Forager Honey Bees, Apis mellifera L
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume8
dc.date.issued2013-10-10
local.identifier.absfor170112
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB4484
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLi, Zhiguo, Zhejiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationChen, Yan Ping, USDA-ARS, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationZhang, Shao Wu, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationChen, Shenglu, Zhejiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationLi, Wenfeng, Zhejiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationYan, Limin, Zheijiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationShi, Liangen, Zhejiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationWu, Lyman, University of Maryland, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationSohr, Alex, Zhejiang University, China
local.contributor.affiliationSu, Songkun, Zhejiang University, China
local.identifier.essn1932-6203
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee77354
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage10
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0077354
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T08:58:50Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84885410750
local.identifier.thomsonID000325814200082
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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