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The Evolution of Political Cartooning in the New Media Age: Cases from Australia, the USA and the UK

Leon, Lucien

Description

The twentieth century saw newspapers replace journals, magazines and pamphlets as the most common vehicle for dissemination and consumption of political cartoons. The internet has brought gradual but inexorable decline in newspaper circulation and readership. Imagining how political cartooning might evolve in the present century, this chapter examines two inter-related aspects: socio-technological forces challenging news-print media; and new media strategies available to practitioners (both...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLeon, Lucien
dc.contributor.editorJessica Milner Davis
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-29T03:14:36Z
dc.identifier.isbn9783319567730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/165380
dc.description.abstractThe twentieth century saw newspapers replace journals, magazines and pamphlets as the most common vehicle for dissemination and consumption of political cartoons. The internet has brought gradual but inexorable decline in newspaper circulation and readership. Imagining how political cartooning might evolve in the present century, this chapter examines two inter-related aspects: socio-technological forces challenging news-print media; and new media strategies available to practitioners (both professional and amateur). Digital media bring a paradigm shift in how the public consumes news-media and engages with associated imagery such as political cartoons and videos. By facilitating access to image-production tools and audiences, digital technology may alter the socio-cultural impact of political cartoons. A computer and an internet connection provide the tools needed to participate creatively—not just consume—in a mode of democratic discourse previously difficult for amateurs to penetrate. Participation does not necessarily equal meaningful dialogue with a substantial audience. Examples discussed include amateur and professional cartoonists in Australia, USA and UK like Rocco Fazzari (Sydney Morning Herald), Walt Handelsman (New Orleans Advocate) and Matt Pritchett (Daily Telegraph), who have successfully transitioned from print-media to digital media via animation and social media. All political cartoonists must embrace this challenge if they are to maintain their traditionally significant input to the democratic conversation.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.relation.ispartofSatire and Politics: the Interplay of Heritage and Practice
dc.relation.isversionof1 Edition
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors
dc.titleThe Evolution of Political Cartooning in the New Media Age: Cases from Australia, the USA and the UK
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2017
local.identifier.absfor190104 - Visual Cultures
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4148336xPUB1
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLeon, Lucien, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage163
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage191
local.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-56774-7_6
dc.date.updated2019-04-14T08:26:32Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationSwitzerland
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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