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Bees can combine range and visual angle to estimate absolute size

Horridge, George Adrian; Zhang, S. W.; Lehrer, M.

Description

Previous work has shown that bees can discriminate objects viewed on a vertical plane on the basis of angular size, as well as objects on a horizontal plane on the basis of range. In the present study, we first demonstrate the bees’ ability to measure range to a vertical surface, and discriminate angular subtense to objects on a horizontal plane. The question whether they can combine the independent measurements of angular size and range to infer the absolute size of an object is then examined...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHorridge, George Adrian
dc.contributor.authorZhang, S. W.
dc.contributor.authorLehrer, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-20T00:36:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/165143
dc.description.abstractPrevious work has shown that bees can discriminate objects viewed on a vertical plane on the basis of angular size, as well as objects on a horizontal plane on the basis of range. In the present study, we first demonstrate the bees’ ability to measure range to a vertical surface, and discriminate angular subtense to objects on a horizontal plane. The question whether they can combine the independent measurements of angular size and range to infer the absolute size of an object is then examined for the horizontal and vertical planes. Bees were trained to expect a reward of sugar solution when they correctly discriminate a black circular target of fixed absolute size from a similar target which is of different absolute size. Apart from absolute size, the two targets may differ from each other in either angular size, or range, or both, depending on the experiment. In the experiments conducted on a vertical plane, the two targets were each placed in one arm of an Y-shaped choice box. In the experiments on the horizontal plane the bees could freely fly above the targets. In both types of experiments, using a variety of test situations, the bees discriminate the target of a given absolute size irrespective of angular size or range.
dc.format.extent9 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoyal Society
dc.rights© 1992 The Royal Society and the authors
dc.sourcePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectbees vision
dc.subjectangular size
dc.subjectrange
dc.subjectabsolute size
dc.subjectobject
dc.subjecthorizontal and vertical planes
dc.titleBees can combine range and visual angle to estimate absolute size
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume337
dcterms.dateAccepted1992-02-11
dc.date.issued1992-07-29
local.publisher.urlhttps://royalsociety.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHorridge, George Adrian, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CoS Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationZhang, S. W., Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, CoS Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.identifier.essn1471-2970
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1279
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage49
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage57
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rstb.1992.0082
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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