Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Penguin ectoparasite panmixia suggests extensive host movement within a colony

Moon, Katherine; Dann, Peter; Chown, Steven; McGaughran, Angela; Fraser, Ceridwen

Description

Parasite population structure can be used to infer fine-scale movement in host species. Many penguin species form large social colonies, and are highly philopatric, returning to the same nest or burrow, along the same route, after each trip to sea. Within a colony, however, the local abundance, physical similarity, and nocturnal habits of penguins hinder the observation of fine-scale movements. To determine the extent of movement and interaction of penguins within colonies, a genotyping by...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoon, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorDann, Peter
dc.contributor.authorChown, Steven
dc.contributor.authorMcGaughran, Angela
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Ceridwen
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-08T05:57:13Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-8038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/164397
dc.description.abstractParasite population structure can be used to infer fine-scale movement in host species. Many penguin species form large social colonies, and are highly philopatric, returning to the same nest or burrow, along the same route, after each trip to sea. Within a colony, however, the local abundance, physical similarity, and nocturnal habits of penguins hinder the observation of fine-scale movements. To determine the extent of movement and interaction of penguins within colonies, a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach was used to study the fine-scale structure of ticks-which depend on host movements for dispersal-exploiting the largest Little Penguin (Eudyptula novaehollandiae) colony in Australia (Phillip Island, Victoria). No barriers to tick gene flow were identified, and we infer that extensive penguin movement occurs throughout the colony. Our findings support the hypothesis that some penguin species are highly gregarious, socializing widely within colonies despite strong nest-site philopatry.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales (Ethel Mary Read Research Grant), the Centre for Biodiversity Analysis (Ignition Grant), and a Sea World Research and Rescue Foundation Inc. grant (SWR/4/2014).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Ornithologists Union
dc.rights© 2018 American Ornithological Society
dc.sourceAuk
dc.titlePenguin ectoparasite panmixia suggests extensive host movement within a colony
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume135
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB10358
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMoon, Katherine, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDann, Peter, Phillip Island Nature Park Research
local.contributor.affiliationChown, Steven, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationMcGaughran, Angela, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFraser, Ceridwen, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage657
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage668
local.identifier.doi10.1642/AUK-17-226.1
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2019-03-31T07:17:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85047947589
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Moon_Penguin_ectoparasite_panmixia_2018.pdf766.81 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator