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Global Optimisation for Energy System

Bestuzheva, Ksenia

Description

The goal of global optimisation is to find globally optimal solutions, avoiding local optima and other stationary points. The aim of this thesis is to provide more efficient global optimisation tools for energy systems planning and operation. Due to the ongoing increasing of complexity and decentralisation of power systems, the use of advanced mathematical techniques that produce reliable solutions becomes necessary. The task of developing such methods is complicated by the fact that most...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBestuzheva, Ksenia
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-02T00:31:17Z
dc.date.available2019-07-02T00:31:17Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/164306
dc.description.abstractThe goal of global optimisation is to find globally optimal solutions, avoiding local optima and other stationary points. The aim of this thesis is to provide more efficient global optimisation tools for energy systems planning and operation. Due to the ongoing increasing of complexity and decentralisation of power systems, the use of advanced mathematical techniques that produce reliable solutions becomes necessary. The task of developing such methods is complicated by the fact that most energy-related problems are nonconvex due to the nonlinear Alternating Current Power Flow equations and the existence of discrete elements. In some cases, the computational challenges arising from the presence of non-convexities can be tackled by relaxing the definition of convexity and identifying classes of problems that can be solved to global optimality by polynomial time algorithms. One such property is known as invexity and is defined by every stationary point of a problem being a global optimum. This thesis investigates how the relation between the objective function and the structure of the feasible set is connected to invexity and presents necessary conditions for invexity in the general case and necessary and sufficient conditions for problems with two degrees of freedom. However, nonconvex problems often do not possess any provable convenient properties, and specialised methods are necessary for providing global optimality guarantees. A widely used technique is solving convex relaxations in order to find a bound on the optimal solution. Semidefinite Programming relaxations can provide good quality bounds, but they suffer from a lack of scalability. We tackle this issue by proposing an algorithm that combines decomposition and linearisation approaches. In addition to continuous non-convexities, many problems in Energy Systems model discrete decisions and are expressed as mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLPs). The formulation of a MINLP is of significant importance since it affects the quality of dual bounds. In this thesis we investigate algebraic characterisations of on/off constraints and develop a strengthened version of the Quadratic Convex relaxation of the Optimal Transmission Switching problem. All presented methods were implemented in mathematical modelling and optimisation frameworks PowerTools and Gravity.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectGlobal optimisation
dc.subjectglobal optimization
dc.subjectoptimal power flow
dc.subjectconvex relaxations
dc.subjectinvexity
dc.subjectmixed-integer optimisation
dc.subjectmixed-integer optimization
dc.titleGlobal Optimisation for Energy System
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorHijazi, Hassan
local.contributor.supervisorcontacthassan.hijazi@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2019
local.description.notesthe author deposited 2/07/2019
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2018
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Computer Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d1b32ef24040
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.mintdoimint
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