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MS Sunshine Study: Sun Exposure But Not Vitamin D Is Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Risk in Blacks and Hispanics

Langer_Gould, Annette; Lucas, Robyn; Xiang, Anny; Chen, Lie H; Wu, Jun; Gonzalez, Edlin; Haraszti, Samantha; Smith, Jessica B; Quach, Hong; Barcellos, Lisa F

Description

Multiple sclerosis (MS) incidence and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels vary by race/ethnicity. We examined the consistency of beneficial effects of 25OHD and/or sun exposure for MS risk across multiple racial/ethnic groups. We recruited incident MS cases and controls (blacks 116 cases/131 controls; Hispanics 183/197; whites 247/267) from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California into the MS Sunshine Study to simultaneously examine sun exposure and 25OHD, accounting for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLanger_Gould, Annette
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorXiang, Anny
dc.contributor.authorChen, Lie H
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Edlin
dc.contributor.authorHaraszti, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jessica B
dc.contributor.authorQuach, Hong
dc.contributor.authorBarcellos, Lisa F
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T03:48:53Z
dc.date.available2019-06-20T03:48:53Z
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/164122
dc.description.abstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) incidence and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels vary by race/ethnicity. We examined the consistency of beneficial effects of 25OHD and/or sun exposure for MS risk across multiple racial/ethnic groups. We recruited incident MS cases and controls (blacks 116 cases/131 controls; Hispanics 183/197; whites 247/267) from the membership of Kaiser Permanente Southern California into the MS Sunshine Study to simultaneously examine sun exposure and 25OHD, accounting for genetic ancestry and other factors. Higher lifetime ultraviolet radiation exposure (a rigorous measure of sun exposure) was associated with a lower risk of MS independent of serum 25OHD levels in blacks (adjusted OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.31-0.83; p = 0.007) and whites (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.48-0.94; p = 0.020) with a similar magnitude of effect that did not reach statistical significance in Hispanics (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.42-1.04; p = 0.071). Higher serum 25OHD levels were associated with a lower risk of MS only in whites. No association was found in Hispanics or blacks regardless of how 25OHD was modeled. Lifetime sun exposure appears to reduce the risk of MS regardless of race/ethnicity. In contrast, serum 25OHD levels are not associated with MS risk in blacks or Hispanics. Our findings challenge the biological plausibility of vitamin D deficiency as causal for MS and call into question the targeting of specific serum 25OHD levels to achieve health benefits, particularly in blacks and Hispanics.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMDPI Publishing
dc.rights© 2018 by the authors.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceNutrients
dc.titleMS Sunshine Study: Sun Exposure But Not Vitamin D Is Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Risk in Blacks and Hispanics
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor110904 - Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
local.identifier.absfor111705 - Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4102339xPUB315
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLanger_Gould, Annette, Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, Robyn, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationXiang, Anny, Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationChen, Lie H, Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationWu, Jun, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationGonzalez, Edlin, Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California,
local.contributor.affiliationHaraszti, Samantha , Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Philadelphia
local.contributor.affiliationSmith , Jessica B , Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California,
local.contributor.affiliationQuach, Hong, University of California Berkeley Berkeley CA
local.contributor.affiliationBarcellos, Lisa F , School of Public Health University of California
local.bibliographicCitation.issue268
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage14
local.identifier.doi10.3390/nu10030268
local.identifier.absseo920503 - Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
local.identifier.absseo920111 - Nervous System and Disorders
local.identifier.absseo920404 - Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
dc.date.updated2019-03-24T07:18:52Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85042646170
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceLicensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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