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Vitamin D-Binding Protein Polymorphisms, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Sunshine and Multiple Sclerosis

Langer_Gould, Annette; Lucas, Robyn; Xiang, Anny; Wu, Jun; Chen, Lie H; Gonzales, Edlin; Haraszti, Samantha; Smith, Jessica B; Quach, Hong; Barcellos, Lisa F

Description

Blacks have different dominant polymorphisms in the vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene that result in higher bioavailable vitamin D than whites. This study tested whether the lack of association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) risk in blacks and Hispanics is due to differences in these common polymorphisms (rs7041, rs4588). We recruited incident MS cases and controls (blacks 116 cases/131 controls; Hispanics 183/197; whites 247/267) from Kaiser Permanente...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLanger_Gould, Annette
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Robyn
dc.contributor.authorXiang, Anny
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jun
dc.contributor.authorChen, Lie H
dc.contributor.authorGonzales, Edlin
dc.contributor.authorHaraszti, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jessica B
dc.contributor.authorQuach, Hong
dc.contributor.authorBarcellos, Lisa F
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T03:45:29Z
dc.date.available2019-06-20T03:45:29Z
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/164121
dc.description.abstractBlacks have different dominant polymorphisms in the vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene that result in higher bioavailable vitamin D than whites. This study tested whether the lack of association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) risk in blacks and Hispanics is due to differences in these common polymorphisms (rs7041, rs4588). We recruited incident MS cases and controls (blacks 116 cases/131 controls; Hispanics 183/197; whites 247/267) from Kaiser Permanente Southern California. AA is the dominant rs7041 genotype in blacks (70.0%) whereas C is the dominant allele in whites (79.0% AC/CC) and Hispanics (77.1%). Higher 25OHD levels were associated with a lower risk of MS in whites who carried at least one copy of the C allele but not AA carriers. No association was found in Hispanics or blacks regardless of genotype. Higher ultraviolet radiation exposure was associated with a lower risk of MS in blacks (OR = 0.06), Hispanics and whites who carried at least one copy of the C allele but not in others. Racial/ethnic variations in bioavailable vitamin D do not explain the lack of association between 25OHD and MS in blacks and Hispanics. These findings further challenge the biological plausibility of vitamin D deficiency as causal for MS.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMDPI Publishing
dc.rights© 2018 by the authors.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceNutrients
dc.titleVitamin D-Binding Protein Polymorphisms, 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Sunshine and Multiple Sclerosis
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor111711 - Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
local.identifier.absfor110904 - Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4102339xPUB317
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLanger_Gould, Annette, Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, Robyn, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationXiang, Anny, Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationWu, Jun, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationChen, Lie H, Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationGonzales, Edlin, Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California
local.contributor.affiliationHaraszti, Samantha , Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Philadelphia
local.contributor.affiliationSmith , Jessica B , Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California,
local.contributor.affiliationQuach, Hong, University of California Berkeley Berkeley CA
local.contributor.affiliationBarcellos, Lisa F , School of Public Health University of California
local.bibliographicCitation.issue184
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.3390/nu10020184.
local.identifier.absseo920111 - Nervous System and Disorders
local.identifier.absseo920401 - Behaviour and Health
local.identifier.absseo920404 - Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response)
dc.date.updated2019-03-24T07:18:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85041812705
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceLicensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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